Etymology
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machinery (n.)

1680s; from machine (n.) + -ery. Originally theatrical, "devices for creating stage effects" (which also was a sense of Greek mēkhanē); meaning "machines or parts of machines considered collectively," is attested from 1731. Transferred meaning "any complex system of (non-mechanical) means to carry on a particular work" is by 1770. Middle English had machinament "a contrivance" (early 15c.).

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ski-lift (n.)
by 1949, from ski + lift (n.) in the "hoisting machinery" sense.
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Jinny 
also Ginny, fem. proper name, originally a diminutive of Jane, and like Jenny it also was used of machinery.
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oil-can (n.)

"can for holding oil," especially one with a long, narrow, tapering spout, used to oil machinery, 1839, from oil (n.) + can (n.).

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apparat (n.)
"administrative machinery of the Communist Party in Russia," 1950, from Russian, from German apparat "apparatus, instrument," from Latin apparatus "tools, implements" (see apparatus).
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loader (n.)
late 15c., "person who loads," agent noun from load (v.). Of machinery, by 1862.
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widow-maker (n.)
"something lethally dangerous" (war, the sea, dangerous machinery, etc.), 1590s, from widow (n.) + maker.
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millwright (n.)

"engineer who designs and builds mills and their machinery," late 15c., from mill (n.1) + wright.

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machine-made (adj.)

"made by a machine or machinery" (opposed to man-made), by 1837, from machine (n.) + made.

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dead-center (adj., adv.)

"in the exact middle," 1874, the noun phrase (1836) in reference to lathes or other rotating machinery, meaning the point which does not revolve; see dead (adj.).

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