Etymology
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lyric (n.)

"a lyric poem" (one suggestive of music or fit to be sung), 1580s, from French lyrique "short poem expressing personal emotion," from Latin lyricus "of or for the lyre," from Greek lyrikos "singing to the lyre," from lyra (see lyre). Meaning "words of a popular song" is first recorded 1876. Related: lyrics.

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lyric (adj.)
1580s, "pertaining to or adopted for the lyre or the harp," hence "suggestive of song or musical effect;" see lyric (n.).
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lyrical (adj.)
1580s, from lyric (n.) + -al (1). Related: Lyrically.
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lyricism (n.)
1760, perhaps an isolated use; common after mid-19c., from lyric + -ism.
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lyricist (n.)
1832, "one skilled in lyric composition, lyric poet;" from lyric (n.) + -ist. Meaning "one who writes words for music" is from 1908.
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canzone (n.)
1580s, a style of lyric poetry, from Italian canzone, from Latin cantionem (nominative cantio) "singing, song" (also source of Spanish cancion, French chanson), noun of action from past participle stem of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). In Italian or Provençal, a song resembling the madrigal but less strict in style. In English as "a musical setting of such lyric poetry" (also canzona) by 1880.
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Pindaric (adj.)

1630s, pertaining to or in the (reputed) style of Pindar, from Latin Pindaricus, from Greek Pindaros, the Greek lyric poet (c. 522-443 B.C.E.).

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Erato 

muse who presided over lyric poetry, literally "the Lovely," from Greek Eratо̄, from  erastos "loved, beloved; lovely, charming," verbal adjective of eran "to love, to be in love with" (see Eros).

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ode (n.)

1580s, from French ode (c. 1500), from Late Latin ode "lyric song," from Greek ōidē, an Attic contraction of aoidē "song, ode;" related to aeidein (Attic aidein) "to sing;" aoidos (Attic oidos) "a singer, singing;" aude "voice, tone, sound," probably from a PIE *e-weid-, perhaps from root *wed- "to speak." In classical use, "a poem intended to be sung;" in modern use usually a rhymed lyric, often an address, usually dignified, rarely extending to 150 lines. Related: Odic.

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roundel (n.)

c. 1300, "a circle, anything round;" early 14c., "a round slice;" from Old French rondel, rondeaul "round dance; dance lyric; roundel," from rond "round" (see round (n.)). From late 14c. as "an ornamental ball or knob;" also "a short poem on two rhymes."

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