Etymology
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luster (n.1)

"gloss, radiance, quality of shining by reflecting light," 1520s, from French lustre "gloss, radiance" (14c.), common Romanic (cognates: Spanish and Portuguese lustre, Rumanian lustru, Italian lustro "splendor, brilliancy"), a noun ultimately from Latin lustrare "spread light over, brighten, illumine," which is related to lustrum "purification" (from PIE *leuk-stro-, suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness").

Especially "quality of glossiness or radiance in a textile material or fabric." Figurative meaning "radiant beauty" is from c. 1600; that of "splendor, renown" is from 1550s. Lusterware, also lustre-ware, "stoneware or crockery having surface ornamentations in metallic colors," is attested by 1820.

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luster (n.2)
"one who feels intense longing desire," 1590s, agent noun from lust (v.).
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lusterless (adj.)

"without luster," 1796, from luster (n.1)  + -less.

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lustre (n.)

"gloss, radiance," 1520s, from French lustre (see luster (n.1)), and see -re. Related: Lustreless.

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lustrous 
c. 1600, "reflecting light;" 1742 "giving or shedding light;" see luster (n.1) + -ous. Related: Lustrously; lustrousness.
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lackluster (adj.)
also lack-luster, c. 1600, "dull, wanting brightness" (originally of eyes), first attested in "As You Like It," from lack (v.) + luster (n.1). Such combinations with lack- were frequent once: Shakespeare alone also has lack-love, lack-beard, lack-brain, lack-linen. Outside Shakespeare there was lackland (1590s), of a landless man; lack-Latin (1530s), of an ignorant priest; lack-learning (1590s), lack-wit (Dryden), lack-thought (1829), lack-life (1889), and the comprehensive lack-all (1850).
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lucency (n.)
"brightness, luster, luminosity," 1650s, from lucent + abstract noun suffix -cy. Lucence is from late 15c.
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teriyaki 
1962, from Japanese, from teri "gloss, luster" + yaki "roast."
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water (n.2)

measure of quality of a diamond, c. 1600, from water (n.1), perhaps as a translation of Arabic ma' "water," which also is used in the sense "luster, splendor."

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chatoyant (adj.)

"changing in luster or color," like a cat's eye in the dark, 1816, from French chatoyant, past participle of chatoyer, from chat "cat" (see cat (n.)).

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