Etymology
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lunge (n.)
1735, "a thrust with a sword," originally a fencing term, shortened from allonge, from French allonger "to extend, thrust," from Old French alongier "to lengthen, make long," from à "to" + Old French long, from Latin longus "long" (see long (adj.)).
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lunge (v.)
"to thrust," as in fencing, 1735 (implied in lunged), from lunge (n.). Sense of "make a sudden forward rush" is from 1821. Related: Lunging.
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longeron (n.)
airplane part, 1912, from French longeron, from longer "to skirt, extend along," from allonger "to lengthen" (see lunge (n.)).
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lung (n.)

human or animal respiratory organ, c. 1300, from Old English lungen (plural), from Proto-Germanic *lunganjo- (source also of Old Norse lunge, Old Frisian lungen, Middle Dutch longhe, Dutch long, Old High German lungun, German lunge "lung"), literally "the light organ," from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight" (source also of Russian lëgkij, Polish lekki "light;" Russian lëgkoje "lung").

So called perhaps because in a cook pot lungs of a slaughtered animal float, while the heart, liver, etc., do not. Compare Portuguese leve "lung," from Latin levis "light;" Irish scaman "lungs," from scaman "light;" Welsh ysgyfaint "lungs," from ysgafn "light." See also lights, pulmonary. Lung cancer is attested from 1882. Lung-power "strength of voice" is from 1900.

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riposte (n.)

1707, in fencing, "a quick thrust made after parrying a lunge," from French riposte, etymologically, "a response," by dissimilation from risposte (17c.), from Italian risposta "a reply," noun use of fem. past participle of rispondere "to respond," from Latin respondere "respond, answer to, promise in return" (see respond). Sense of "sharp retort; quick, sharp reply," is attested by 1865, on the notion of "a counter-stroke." As a verb, by 1851.

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remise (n.)

"coach house, house or shelter for a carriage," 1690s, from French remise, noun use of past participle of remettre "to send back," from Latin remittere (see remit). Also from 1690s as "better sort of hired carriage" (voiture de remise). Also in fencing, "a second thrust while still on the lunge after the first has missed," 1823; hence its use in card games, etc.

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