Etymology
Advertisement
lung (n.)

human or animal respiratory organ, c. 1300, from Old English lungen (plural), from Proto-Germanic *lunganjo- (source also of Old Norse lunge, Old Frisian lungen, Middle Dutch longhe, Dutch long, Old High German lungun, German lunge "lung"), literally "the light organ," from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight" (source also of Russian lëgkij, Polish lekki "light;" Russian lëgkoje "lung").

So called perhaps because in a cook pot lungs of a slaughtered animal float, while the heart, liver, etc., do not. Compare Portuguese leve "lung," from Latin levis "light;" Irish scaman "lungs," from scaman "light;" Welsh ysgyfaint "lungs," from ysgafn "light." See also lights, pulmonary. Lung cancer is attested from 1882. Lung-power "strength of voice" is from 1900.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lung-fish (n.)
also lungfish, 1883, from lung (n.) + fish (n.).
Related entries & more 
aqualung (n.)
"portable air tanks and apparatus for breathing underwater," 1950, from aqua- + lung. Developed 1943 by Jacques Cousteau and Emile Gagnan.
Related entries & more 
lights (n.)
"the lungs," c. 1200, literally "the light (in weight) organs," from light (adj.1); also see lung. Obsolete now except in phrases like to knock (someone's) lights out.
Related entries & more 
*legwh- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "not heavy, having little weight."

It forms all or part of: alleviate; alleviation; alto-rilievo; carnival; elevate; elevation; elevator; leaven; legerdemain; leprechaun; Levant; levator; levee; lever; levity; levy (v.) "to raise or collect;" light (adj.1) "not heavy, having little weight;" lighter (n.1) "type of barge used in unloading;" lung; relevance; relevant; releve; relief; relieve.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit laghuh "quick, small;" Greek elakhys "small," elaphros "light;" Latin levare "to raise," levis "light in weight, not heavy;" Old Church Slavonic liguku, Russian lëgkij, Polish lekki, Lithuanian lengvas "light in weight;" Old Irish lu "small," laigiu "smaller, worse;" Gothic leihts, Old English leoht "not heavy, light in weight."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pneumono- 
before vowels pneumon-, word-forming element meaning "lung," from Greek pneumon (genitive pneumonos "lung" (see pneumo-).
Related entries & more 
asbestosis (n.)
"lung disease caused by inhalation of asbestos," 1927; see asbestos + -osis.
Related entries & more 
oolong (n.)

dark variety of Chinese tea, 1844, from Chinese wu-lung, literally "black dragon."

Related entries & more 
pneumonic (adj.)

1670s, "pertaining to the lungs," from Latin pneumonicus, from Greek pneumonikos "of the lungs," from pneumōn "lung" (see pneumo-). From 1783 as "pertaining to pneumonia."

Related entries & more 
inro 
1610s, from Japanese, from Chinese yin "seal" + lung "basket." The small ornamental baskets originally held seals, among other small items.
Related entries & more