Etymology
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lucre (n.)

"gain in money or goods, profit," late 14c., from Old French lucre, from Latin lucrum "material gain, advantage, profit; wealth, riches," of uncertain origin. De Vaan says from Proto-Italic *lukro-, from PIE *lhu-tlo- "seizure, gain," with cognates in Greek apolauo "take hold of, enjoy," leia (Doric laia) "booty;" Gothic laun "reward."

Often specifically in a restricted sense of "base or unworthy gain, money or wealth as the object of greed," hence "greed." Filthy lucre (Titus i.11) is Tyndale's rendering of Greek aiskhron kerdos.

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lucrative (adj.)

"yielding gain, highly profitable," early 15c., from Old French lucratif "profitable" and directly from Latin lucrativus "gainful, profitable," from lucratus, past participle of lucrari "to gain, win, acquire," from lucrum "gain, profit" (see lucre). Related: Lucratively; lucrativeness.

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guerdon (n.)
"reward, recompense" (now only poetic), late 14c., from Old French guerdon, guerredon "reward, recompense, payment," from Medieval Latin widerdonum, from Old High German widarlon "recompense," from widar "against," from Proto-Germanic *withro- (see with) + lon "reward," from Proto-Germanic *launam, from PIE *lau- "gain, profit" (see lucre). Compare Old English wiðerlean "requital, compensation." Form influenced in Medieval Latin by Latin donum "gift." Compare Spanish galardon, Italian guiderone.
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Lucretius 
Roman masc. proper name, originally the name of a Roman gens. The Epicurean philosopher-poet was Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 98-55 B.C.E.). Hence Lucretian (1712).
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Lucretia 
fem. proper name, from Latin Lucretia (source also of French Lucrèce), fem. of Lucretius, Roman masc. proper name, originally the name of a Roman gens.
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