Etymology
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loyalty (n.)

c. 1400, from Old French loialte, leaute "loyalty, fidelity; legitimacy; honesty; good quality" (Modern French loyauté), from loial (see loyal). The Medieval Latin word was legalitas. The earlier Middle English form was leaute (mid-13c.), from the older French form. Loyalty oath first attested 1852.

Allegiance ... is a matter of principle, and applies especially to conduct; the oath of allegiance covers conduct only. Loyalty is a matter of both principle and sentiment, conduct and feeling; it implies enthusiasm and devotion .... [Century Dictionary, 1897]
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tribalism (n.)
1868, "condition of being a tribe," from tribal + -ism. Meaning "group loyalty" attested by 1955.
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tribal (adj.)
1630s, "pertaining to or characteristic of tribes," from tribe + -al (1). Meaning "characterized by a strong sense of loyalty to one's group" is from 1951 (Arendt). As a style of belly-dance from 1999, American English. Related: Tribally.
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-ality 

word-forming element; see -al (1) + -ity. Originally also in reduced form -alty, especially in words from French (mayoralty, etc.), hence the occasional doublet such as fealty/fidelity, realty/reality, specialty/speciality, loyalty/legality.

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coat of arms (n.)

mid-14c., also simply coat (mid-14c.); originally a tunic embroidered or painted with heraldic armorial bearings (worn over armor, etc); see coat (n.) + arm (n.2) and compare Old French cote a armer. Sense transferred in Middle English to the heraldic arms themselves. Hence turncoat, one who put his coat on inside-out to hide the badge of his loyalty (1550s).

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fealty (n.)
c. 1300, feaute, from Old French feauté, earlier fealte, "loyalty, fidelity; homage sworn by a vassal to his overlord; faithfulness," from Latin fidelitatem (nominative fidelitas) "faithfulness, fidelity," from fidelis "loyal, faithful" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade").
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verity (n.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French and Old French verite "truth, sincerity, loyalty" (12c.), from Latin veritatem (nominative veritas) "truth, truthfulness," from verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy"). Modern French vérité, literally "truth," was borrowed into English 1966 as a term for naturalism or realism in film, etc.
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allegiance (n.)
"ties or obligations of a citizen or subject to a government or sovereign," late 14c., formed in English from Anglo-French legaunce "loyalty of a liege-man to his lord," from Old French legeance, from liege (see liege (adj.)). Corrupted in spelling by confusion with the now-obsolete legal term allegeance "alleviation, mitigation" (for which see allay (v.)). General figurative sense of "recognition of claims to respect or duty, observance of obligation" is attested from 1732. French allégeance in this sense is said to be from English.
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disloyalty (n.)

"want of loyalty, unfaithful behavior," early 15c., disloialte, from a variant of Old French desloiaute, desleauté "disloyalty, faithlessness, marital infidelity," from desloial, desleal "treacherous, false, deceitful" (Modern French déloyal), from des- "not, opposite of" (see dis-) + loial "of good quality; faithful; honorable; law-abiding; legitimate, born in wedlock," from Latin legalem, from lex "law" (see legal). Since c. 1600 especially "violation of allegiance or duty to a state or sovereign."

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devotion (n.)

c. 1200, devocioun, "profound religious emotion, awe, reverence," from Old French devocion "devotion, piety" and directly from Latin devotionem (nominative devotio), noun of action from past-participle stem of devovere "dedicate by a vow, sacrifice oneself, promise solemnly," from de "down, away" (see de-) + vovere "to vow" (see vow (n.)). From late 14c. as "an act of religious worship, a religious exercise" (now usually devotions).

In ancient Latin, "act of consecrating by a vow," also "loyalty, fealty, allegiance;" in Church Latin, "devotion to God, piety." The application to secular situations came to English via Italian and French; sense of "act of setting apart or consecrating" is from c. 1500.

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