Etymology
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loud (adj.)
Middle English, from Old English hlud "noisy; making or emitting noise" (of voices, musical instruments, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *hludaz "heard" (source also of Old Frisian and Old Saxon hlud, Middle Dutch luut, Dutch luid, Old High German hlut, German laut "loud"), from PIE *klutos- (source also of Sanskrit srutah, Greek klytos "heard of, celebrated," Latin inclutus "renowned, famous," Armenian lu "known," Irish cloth "noble, brave," Welsh clod "praise, fame"), suffixed form of root *kleu- "to hear."

Of places, "noisy," from 1590s. Application to colors, garments, etc. ("flashy, showy") is by 1849. Also used colloquially of notably strong or bad smells. Paired with clear (adj.) at least since c. 1650.
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loud (adv.)
Old English hlude "loudly, noisily," from Proto-Germanic *khludai (source also of Dutch luid, German laut), from the source of loud (adj.).
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loud-speaker (n.)
also loudspeaker, "device for amplifying sound using an electric current," 1898, from loud (adj.) + speaker (n.).
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loud-mouth (n.)
also loudmouth, "loud or overly talkative person," 1872, from loud (adj.) + mouth (n.). As an adjective from 1660s; loud-mouth'd is from 1620s.
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loudness (n.)
Old English hludnis "loudness, clamor;" see loud + -ness.
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aloud (adv.)
late 13c., "with a loud voice;" c. 1300, "audibly, not whispered;" contraction of on loude; see a- (1) + loud.
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Ludwig 
masc. proper name, from Old High German hlud(o)wig, literally "famous in war," from Proto-Germanic *hluda- "heard of, famous" (see loud) + *wiga "war" (see victory). Compare Louis.
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Clothilde 
fem. proper name, via French, from German Klothilde, literally "famous in battle," from Old High German *klod "famous" (related to Old English hlud; see loud (adj.)) + hild "battle" (see Hilda).
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Clytaemnestra 
also Clytemnestra, wife and murderess of Agamemnon, from Greek Klytaimnestra, from klytos "celebrated, heard of" (see loud) + mnester "wooer, suitor," literally "willing to mind, mindful of," related to mnasthai "to remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think."
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