Etymology
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loquacious (adj.)
1660s, a back-formation from loquacity, or else formed from stem of Latin loquax (genitive loquacis) "talkative," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak") + -ous. Compare French loquace, Spanish locuaz. Related: Loquaciously; loquaciousness.
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*tolkw- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to speak."

It forms all or part of: circumlocution; colloquium; colloquy; elocution; eloquence; grandiloquence; interlocution; interlocutor; locution; locutory; loquacious; loquacity; loquitur; magniloquence; magniloquent; obloquy; soliloquy; somniloquy; vaniloquence; ventriloquism; ventriloquy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin loqui "to speak;" Old Irish ad-tluch- "to thank," to-tluch- "to ask;" Old Church Slavonic tloko "interpretation, explanation."
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talky (adj.)
"loquacious," 1815, from talk (n.) + -y (2). Related: Talkiness.
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talkative (adj.)
early 15c.; see talk (v.) + -ative. An early hybrid word in English. Originally especially "boastful," but now considered less pejorative than loquacious or garrulous. Related: Talkatively; talkativeness.
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Bellatrix 

bright star in the left shoulder of Orion, from Latin bellatrix "female warrior," frequently used as an adjective, "warlike, skilled in war," fem. of bellator "to wage war," from bellum "war" (see bellicose). The Latin name, from the Alfonsine Tables (mid-13c.), very loosely translates the Arabic name for the star, Al Najid "the conqueror."

In astrology it was the natal star of all destined to great civil or military honors, and rendered women born under its influence lucky and loquacious; or as old Thomas Hood said, "Women born under this constellation shall have mighty tongues." [Richard Hinckley Allen, "Star Names and Their Meanings," 1899]
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