Etymology
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loop (n.)
late 14c., "a fold or doubling of cloth, rope, leather, cord, etc.," of uncertain origin. OED favors a Celtic origin (compare Gaelic lub "bend," Irish lubiam), which in English was perhaps influenced by or blended with Old Norse hlaup "a leap, run" (see leap (v.)). As a feature of a fingerprint, 1880. In reference to magnetic recording tape or film, first recorded 1931. Computer programming sense "sequence of instructions executed repeatedly" first attested 1947.
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loop (v.)

c. 1400, loupen, "to draw (a leash through a ring)," from loop (n.). Sense of "form into a loop or loops" (transitive) is from 1832; transitive meaning "form (something) into loops" is from 1856. Related: Looped (1934 in the slang sense "drunk"); looping. Loop the loop (1900) originally was in reference to roller-coasters at amusement parks.

"Loop-the-Loop" is the name of a new entertainment which goes further in the way of tempting Providence than anything yet invented. The "Loop" is an immense circle of track in the air. A car on a mimic railway shoots down a very steep incline, and is impelled around the inner side of this loop. ... The authorities at Coney Island are said to have prohibited "looping-the-loop" because women break their corset strings in their efforts to catch their breath as they sweep down the incline, and moreover, a young man is reported to have ruptured a blood vessel in his liver. ["Philadelphia Medical Journal," Aug. 10, 1901]
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loopy (adj.)
1856, "full of loops," from loop (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense "crazy" is attested from 1923. The earlier figurative sense was "crafty, deceitful" (1824), popularized by Scott's novels.
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loophole (n.)
also loop-hole, mid-15c., from hole (n.). + Middle English loupe "narrow window, slit-opening in a wall" for protection of archers while shooting, or for light and ventilation (c. 1300), which, along with Medieval Latin loupa, lobia probably is a specialized word from a continental Germanic source, such as Middle Dutch lupen "to watch, peer." Figurative sense of "outlet, means of escape" is from 1660s.
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slipknot (n.)
also slip-knot, 1650s, from slip (v.) + knot (n.). One which easily can be "slipped" or undone by pulling on the loose end of the last loop.
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frog (n.2)

type of fastening for clothing, 1719, originally a belt loop for carrying a weapon, of unknown origin; perhaps from Portuguese froco, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown etymology.

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ankh (n.)
tau cross with an oval loop at the top, Egyptian symbol of life, 1873, from Egyptian ankh, literally "life, soul." Also known as crux ansata.
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hank (n.)
late 13c., "a loop of rope" (in nautical use), probably from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse hönk "a hank, coil," hanki "a clasp (of a chest);" ultimately related to hang (v.). From 1550s as a length of yarn or thread.
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terry (n.)
"loop raised in pile-weaving, left uncut," 1784, of uncertain origin, possibly an alteration of French tiré "drawn," from past participle of tirer "draw out" (compare German gezogener Sammet "drawn velvet").
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noose (n.)

"loop formed by fastening a running knot or slip-knot," mid-15c., perhaps from Old French nos or cognate Old Provençal nous "knot," from Latin nodus "knot" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). Rare before c. 1600.

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