Etymology
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logistics (n.)

"art of moving, quartering, and supplying troops," 1846, from French (l'art) logistique "(art) of quartering troops," which apparently is from logis "lodging" (from Old French logeiz "shelter for an army, encampment," from loge; see lodge (n.)) + Greek-derived suffix -istique (see -istic). The form in French was influenced by logistique, from the Latin source of English logistic. Related: Logistical.

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logistic (adj.)
"pertaining to logic," 1620s, from Medieval Latin logisticus, from Greek logistikos "skilled in calculating; endued with reason," from logistes "a calculator," from logos "calculation, proportion" (see Logos). Related: Logistical (1560s); logistically. Logistics, from this word, in the sense "art of arithmetical calculation" is from 1650s.
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