Etymology
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locus (n.)
(plural loci), 1715, "place, spot, locality," from Latin locus "a place, spot; appointed place, position; locality, region, country; degree, rank, order; topic, subject," from Old Latin stlocus, a word of uncertain origin. Used by Latin writers for Greek topos. Mathematical sense by 1750.
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locable (adj.)
1816, "that can be placed," from Latin locare "to place, put, set, arrange," (from locus "a place;" see locus) + -able. Alternative formation locatable is attested from 1838.
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loco- 
word-forming element meaning "from place to place," from combining form of Latin locus "a place" (see locus).
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locum-tenens (n.)
legal Latin, "one who holds the place (of another);" from locum, accusative of locus "place" (see locus) + tenens, present participle of tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."
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locomotion (n.)
1640s, "action or power of motion," from Latin loco "from a place" (ablative of locus "a place;" see locus) + motionem (nominative motio) "motion, a moving" (see motion (n.)). From 1788 as "movement from place to place."
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lieu (n.)
late 13c., usually as part of the phrase in lieu of "in the place, room, or stead of," from Old French lieu, lou "place, position, situation, rank" (10c.) from Latin locum (nominative locus) "a place" (see locus).
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in loco parentis 
legal Latin, 1640s in English, literally "in the place of a parent," from loco, ablative of locus "a place" (see locus (n.)) + parentis, genitive of parens "parent" (see parent (n.)).
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locator (n.)
c. 1600, "one who lets (something) for hire," a legal term, from Latin locator "one who lets," agent noun from locare "to put, place, set," from locus "a place" (see locus). As "one who settles upon land by legal right of possession," 1803, American English. Of things which locate, from 1902.
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loc. cit. 
abbreviation of Latin loco citato or locus citatus "in the place (already) cited;" hence, "in the book that has been previously quoted." See locus, cite. In use in English books by 1704.
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collocate (v.)

"to set or place together," 1510s, from Latin collocatus, past participle of collocare "to arrange, place together, set in a place," from assimilated form of com "together" (see com-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place" (see locus). Related: collocated; collocating.

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