Etymology
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locomotive (adj.)
1610s, "pertaining to movement," from French locomotif, from Latin loco "from a place" (ablative of locus "place;" see locus) + Late Latin motivus "moving" (see motive).

From 1650s as "moving from place to place;" by 1814 as "having the power of moving by itself. The noun meaning "engine which travels on rails by its own power" is from 1829, short for locomotive engine, which is attested from 1814. A locomotive engine used without rails was a traction engine, which became tractor.
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choo-choo (n.)
Child's name for "steam-engine locomotive," 1895, echoic (choo-choo cars is attested from 1891).
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entrain (v.2)
"get on board a locomotive train," 1860s, from en- (1) "in, into" + train (n.). Related: Entrained.
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cow-catcher (n.)

"strong frame in front of a locomotive for removing obstructions such as stray cattle," 1838, from cow (n.) + catcher.

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wallbanger (n.)
cocktail made from vodka, Galliano, and orange juice, by 1969, in full Harvey wallbanger. Probably so called from its effect on the locomotive skills of the consumer.
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locomotor (adj.)
1870, "of or pertaining to locomotion;" probably based on locomotion (as motor/motion). Earlier as a noun, "something with locomotive power" (1822). Related: Locomotory; locomotorial.
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tender (n.1)
"person who tends another," late 15c., probably an agent noun formed from Middle English tenden "attend to" (see tend (v.2)); later extended to locomotive engineers (1825) and barmen (1883). The meaning "small boat used to attend larger ones" first recorded 1670s.
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decapod (n.)

1819, "ten-legged animal, type of crustacean having ten legs" (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), from French décapode (1806), from Modern Latin Decapoda (animalia), from Greek dekapoda, neuter plural of dekapous "ten-footed" (see ten + foot (n.)). From 1885 in reference to a type of locomotive with ten driving-wheels.

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airplane (n.)
1907, air-plane, from air (n.1) + plane (n.1); though the earliest uses are British, the word caught on in American English, where it largely superseded earlier aeroplane (1873 in this sense and still common in British English). Aircraft as "airplane" also is from 1907. Lord Byron, speculating on future travel, used air-vessel (1822); and in 1865 aeromotive (based on locomotive) was used, also air-boat (1870).
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jerkwater (adj.)
also jerk-water, "petty, inferior, insignificant," 1890, earlier in reference to certain railroad trains and lines (1878); in both cases the notion is of a steam locomotive crew having to take on boiler water from a trough or a creek because there was no water tank; see jerk (v.1) + water (n.1). This led to an adjectival use of jerk as "inferior, insignificant;" hence also jerkwater town (1893).
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