Etymology
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locality (n.)

1620s, "fact of having a place," from French localité (16c.), from Late Latin localitatem (nominative localitas) "locality" (as a quality of bodies), from localis "belonging to a place, pertaining to a place," from Latin locus "a place, spot" (see locus). Meaning "a geographical place or district" is from 1830.

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localism (n.)
1803, "attachment to a particular locality," from local (adj.) + -ism. Always tending toward "limitation through local attachment, provincialism." Meaning "something (especially a way of speech) characteristic of a particular locality" is from 1823.
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place-name (n.)

"the name of a place or locality," by 1868, from place (n.) + name (n.).

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delocalize (v.)

"free from limitations of locality," 1839, from de- "do the opposite of" + localize. Related: Delocalized; delocalizing.

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digging (n.)

1530s, "locality where mining is carried on," verbal noun from dig (v.). Diggings, colloquial for "lodgings, quarters" is by 1838.

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locus (n.)
(plural loci), 1715, "place, spot, locality," from Latin locus "a place, spot; appointed place, position; locality, region, country; degree, rank, order; topic, subject," from Old Latin stlocus, a word of uncertain origin. Used by Latin writers for Greek topos. Mathematical sense by 1750.
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locale (n.)

1816, false spelling of local in a sense "a place, a locality, a scene," especially with reference to circumstances connected with it, from this sense in French local, noun use of local (adj.), from Latin locus "a place" (see locus). The English spelling with -e probably is based on morale and intended to indicate stress.

The word's right to exist depends upon the question whether the two indispensable words locality & scene give all the shades of meaning required, or whether something intermediate is useful. [Fowler]
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non-resident (n.)

also nonresident, early 15c., "a clergyman who fails to reside in the locality of his benefice," from non- + resident. General sense of "one who does not reside within a particular jurisdiction" is by 1819.

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localitis (n.)
"obsession with the problems of one's locality and consequent failure to see big pictures," 1943, U.S. World War II jargon, originally of military strategists, from local (adj.) + transferred use of medical suffix -itis.
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Cameron 
Highland clan name, from Gaelic camshron "wry or hooked nose" (the Highland clan; the Lowland name is for a locality in Fife). The Cameronians (1680s) were followers of Richard Cameron in Scotland who refused to accept the indulgence of Charles II during the prosecution of the Presbyterians.
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