Etymology
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local (adj.)

late 14c., "pertaining to position," originally medical: "confined to a particular part of the body;" from Old French local "local" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin localis "pertaining to a place," from Latin locus "a place, spot" (see locus).

The meaning "limited to a particular place" is from c. 1500. Local color is from 1721, originally a term in painting; the meaning "anything picturesque" is from c. 1900. Local option (1868, American English) is from the prohibition movement: "the right of a community to vote on whether to allow the sale of intoxicating liquor there." Local talent "attractive women thereabouts" is from 1947 in UK slang; earlier it was used in reference to entertainment acts in shows, radio broadcast, etc.

Thus, with the local talent, we have many factors which help "sell" is in quantities far beyond what the commercial market would carry. Pride in children, interest in relatives and friends, and pride in locality all give impetus to the development of home talent. [Horace Boies Hawthorn, "The Sociology of Rural Life," 1926]
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local (n.)
early 15c., "a medicament applied to a particular part of the body," from local (adj.). The Old French adjective also was used as a noun, "place, position." Meaning "inhabitant of a particular locality" is from 1825. The meaning "local item in a newspaper" is from 1869; that of "a local train" is from 1879; "local branch of a trade union" is from 1888; "neighborhood pub" is from 1934.
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locally (adv.)
mid-15c., "with respect to space or place," from local (adj.) + -ly (2). From 1803 as "with regard to a particular place or region."
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localize (v.)
"make local, assign to a particular place," 1792, from local (adj.) + -ize. Related: Localized; localizing; localizable (1847, originally of diseases).
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localist (n.)
"one focused on local conditions," 1680s, from local (adj.) + -ist. Related: Localistic "tending to see things as of local nature or origin" (1882).
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localism (n.)
1803, "attachment to a particular locality," from local (adj.) + -ism. Always tending toward "limitation through local attachment, provincialism." Meaning "something (especially a way of speech) characteristic of a particular locality" is from 1823.
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patrilocal (adj.)

1906, in reference to the customs of certain social groups where a married couple settles in the husband's house or community, from patri- + local (adj.).

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localitis (n.)
"obsession with the problems of one's locality and consequent failure to see big pictures," 1943, U.S. World War II jargon, originally of military strategists, from local (adj.) + transferred use of medical suffix -itis.
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matrilocal (adj.)

1897, from matri- + local. Applied to the custom in certain social groups for a married couple to settle in the wife's home or community.

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locavore (n.)
one who eats only locally grown or raised food, by 2001, from local (adj.) + ending abstracted from carnivore, etc., ultimately from Latin vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").
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