Etymology
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Swansea 
a Scandinavian name, probably literally "Sveinn's Island."
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Esmerelda 
fem. proper name, from Spanish, literally "emerald."
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Tuscarora 
Iroquoian people originally inhabiting what is now North Carolina, 1640s, from Catawba (Siouan) /taskarude:/, literally "dry-salt eater," a folk-etymologizing of the people's name for themselves, Tuscarora (Iroquoian) /skaru:re/, literally "hemp-gatherers."
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Flaherty 
surname, Irish Flaithbheartach, literally "Bright-Ruler."
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Hillel 
masc. proper name, from Hebrew, literally "he praised."
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Elihu 
masc. proper name, Hebrew, literally "he is my God."
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Vera 
fem. proper name, from Latin, literally "true" (see very).
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Dempsey 

surname, from Irish Ó Diomasaigh "descendant of Diomasach," which is literally "proud."

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Lhasa 
capital of Tibet, Tibetan, literally "city of the gods," from lha "god" + sa "city." The Lhasa apso type of dog is so called from 1935 in English, from Tibetan, literally "Lhasa terrier." Earlier name in English was Lhasa terrier (1894).
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Edam (adj.)
1836, type of cheese named for Edam, village in Holland where it was originally made. The place name is literally "the dam on the River Ye," which flows into the Ijsselmeer there, and the river name is literally "river" (see ea).
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