Etymology
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literally (adv.)

1530s, "in a literal sense, according to the exact meaning of the word or words used," from literal + -ly (2). Since late 17c. it has been used in metaphors, hyperbole, etc., to indicate what follows must be taken in the strongest admissible sense. But this is irreconcilable with the word's etymological sense and has led to this much-lamented modern use of it.

We have come to such a pass with this emphasizer that where the truth would require us to insert with a strong expression 'not literally, of course, but in a manner of speaking', we do not hesitate to insert the very word we ought to be at pains to repudiate; ... such false coin makes honest traffic in words impossible. [Fowler, 1924]
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dar 

Arabic word, literally "house," used in place names, such as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, literally "House of Peace," Darfur, etc.

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Erzgebirge 
German, literally "ore mountains."
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Liechtenstein 
German, literally "light stone."
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habanera (n.)
type of Cuban dance, 1874, literally "of Havana."
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Maat 
Egyptian goddess, literally (in Egyptian) "truth."
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Macduff 
Gaelic Mac Dhuibh "son of Dubh," literally "black."
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vizier (n.)
also vizir, 1560s, from Turkish vezir "counsellor," from Arabic wazir "viceroy," literally "one who bears (the burden of office)," literally "porter, carrier," from wazara "he carried." But Klein says Arabic wazir is from Avestan viçira "arbitrator, judge." He also says it replaced Arabic katib, literally "writer," in the sense "secretary of state."
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beche-de-mer (n.)
"sea-slug eaten as a delicacy in the Western Pacific," 1814, from French bêche-de-mer, literally "spade of the sea," a folk-etymology alteration of Portuguese bicho do mar "sea-slug," literally "worm of the sea."
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klutz (n.)
1967, American English, from Yiddish klots "clumsy person, blockhead," literally "block, lump," from Middle High German klotz "lump, ball." Compare German klotz "boor, clod," literally "wooden block" (see clot (n.)).
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