Etymology
Advertisement
literally (adv.)

1530s, "in a literal sense, according to the exact meaning of the word or words used," from literal + -ly (2). Since late 17c. it has been used in metaphors, hyperbole, etc., to indicate what follows must be taken in the strongest admissible sense. But this is irreconcilable with the word's etymological sense and has led to this much-lamented modern use of it.

We have come to such a pass with this emphasizer that where the truth would require us to insert with a strong expression 'not literally, of course, but in a manner of speaking', we do not hesitate to insert the very word we ought to be at pains to repudiate; ... such false coin makes honest traffic in words impossible. [Fowler, 1924]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dar 

Arabic word, literally "house," used in place names, such as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, literally "House of Peace," Darfur, etc.

Related entries & more 
Erzgebirge 
German, literally "ore mountains."
Related entries & more 
Liechtenstein 
German, literally "light stone."
Related entries & more 
entre nous 
"in private," French, literally "between ourselves."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
habanera (n.)
type of Cuban dance, 1874, literally "of Havana."
Related entries & more 
Maat 
Egyptian goddess, literally (in Egyptian) "truth."
Related entries & more 
Swansea 
a Scandinavian name, probably literally "Sveinn's Island."
Related entries & more 
Traviata, La 
title of an opera by Verdi, Italian, literally "the woman led astray," from traviata literally "to lead beyond the way," from tra- "across, beyond" (from Latin trans; see trans-) + via "way" (see via).
Related entries & more 
shiatsu (n.)
1967, from Japanese, literally "finger-pressure."
Related entries & more