Etymology
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liquor (v.)
c. 1500, "to moisten," from liquor (n.). From 1550s as "supply with liquor," 1839 as "drink" (intoxicating liquor). To liquor up "get drunk" is from 1845. Related: Liquored; liquoring.
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liquor (n.)
c. 1200, likur "any matter in a liquid state, a liquid or fluid substance," from Old French licor "fluid, liquid; sap; oil" (12c., Modern French liqueur), from Latin liquorem (nominative liquor) "a liquid, liquor; wine; the sea," originally "liquidity, fluidity," from liquere "be fluid, liquid" (see liquid (adj.)).

Narrowed sense of "fermented or distilled drink" (especially wine) first recorded c. 1300; the broader sense seems to have been obsolete from c. 1700. As long as liquor is in him was a Middle English expression, "as long as he is alive," that is, "as long as he has a drop of blood left." The form in Modern English has been assimilated to Latin, but the old pronunciation persists.
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pot-liquor (n.)

"liquid in which meat has been boiled," 1744, from pot (n.1) + liquor (n.).

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liqueur (n.)
"sweetened, flavored alcoholic liquor," 1729, from French liqueur "liquor, liquid," from Old French licor "liquid." See liquor, which is the same word but borrowed earlier.
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swig (n.)
1540s, "a drink, liquor," later "big or hearty drink of liquor" (1620s), of unknown origin.
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rum-runner (n.)
"smuggler or transporter of illicit liquor," 1919, from rum (n.) + runner.
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sake (n.2)

Japanese fermented liquor made from rice, 1680s, from Japanese sake, literally "alcohol."

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snort (n.)
1808, "act of snorting," from snort (v.). Meaning "a drink of liquor" (especially whiskey) is from 1889.
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bub (n.2)
"strong drink of any kind," especially malt liquor, 1670s, perhaps imitative of the sound of drinking.
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applejack (n.)
also apple-jack, "apple-brandy, liquor distilled from cider," 1816, from apple + jack (n.).
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