Etymology
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liqueur (n.)
"sweetened, flavored alcoholic liquor," 1729, from French liqueur "liquor, liquid," from Old French licor "liquid." See liquor, which is the same word but borrowed earlier.
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Cointreau (n.)

orange-flavored liqueur, named for founders Adolphe and Edouard-Jean Cointreau, brothers from Angers, France, who set up Cointreau Distillery in 1849. The liqueur dates from 1875.

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anisette (n.)
"liqueur flavored with aniseed," 1821, from French Anisette de Bordeaux, from diminutive of anis (see anise).
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chartreuse (n.)

esteemed type of liqueur, 1866, from la Grande-Chartreuse, chief monastery of the Carthusian order, which was founded 11c. and named for the massif de la Chartreuse (Medieval Latin Carthusianus) mountain group in the French Alps, where its first monastery was built. The liqueur recipe dates from early 17c.; the original now is marketed as Les Pères Chartreux. The color name (1884) is from the pale apple-green hue of the best type of the liqueur.

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Grand Marnier (n.)
French cognac-based liqueur, 1901, from French grand "great" (see grand (adj.)) + Marnier-Lapostolle, name of the manufacturer.
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Kahlua 
Mexican coffee-flavored liqueur, produced from 1936, the name said to be from the native Acolhua people, allies of the Aztecs.
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sambuca (n.)

Italian flavored liqueur, made from elderberries, that resembles French anisette, 1971, from Italian, from Latin sambucus "elder tree."

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Tia Maria (n.)
coffee-flavored, rum-based liqueur, originally made in the West Indies, 1948, Spanish, literally "Aunt Mary."
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ratafia (n.)

sweet liqueur flavored with kernels of cherries, apricots, etc., 1690s, from French ratafia (17c.), a word of unknown origin; perhaps ultimately from the same source as arrack.

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Drambuie (n.)

1893, proprietary name of a whiskey liqueur manufactured in Scotland, said by the manufacturer to be from Gaelic dram buidheach, literally "satisfying drink."

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