Etymology
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lip (v.)
c. 1600, "to kiss," from lip (n.). Meaning "to pronounce with the lips only" is from 1789. Related: Lipped; lipping.
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lip (n.)

Old English lippa "lip, one of the two sides of the mouth," from Proto-Germanic *lepjan- (source also of Old Frisian lippa, Middle Dutch lippe, Dutch lip, Old High German lefs, German Lefze, Swedish läpp, Danish læbe). Boutkan and de Vaan reject the traditional IE derivation for this group and Latin labium, though they agree the Latin and Germanic words probably are related. It may be a substratum word. French lippe is an Old French borrowing from a Germanic source.

Transferred sense of "edge or margin of a cup, etc." is from 1590s. Slang sense "saucy talk" is from 1821, probably from the expression move the lip (1570s) "utter even the slightest word (against someone)." To bite (one's) lip "show vexation" is from early 14c. Stiff upper lip as a sign of courage and struggle against despondency is from 1833. Lip gloss is attested from 1939; lip balm from 1877. Related: Lips.

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hare-lip (n.)
also harelip, 1560s, from hare (n.) + lip (n.). So called for resemblance.
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blubber-lip (n.)
"a thick lip," 1660s, from blubber (n.) + lip (n.). Related: Blubber-lipped.
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lip-read (v.)
1880, back-formation from lip-reading, which is attested from 1852 in writings on educating deaf-mutes; from lip (n.) + reading.
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lip-service (n.)
"something proffered but not performed, service with the lips only; insincere profession of good will," 1640s, from lip (n.) + service (n.1). Earlier in same sense was lip-labour (1530s). This was a general pattern in 16c.-17c., for example lip-wisdom (1580s), the wisdom of those who do not practice what they preach; lip-religion (1590s), lip-devotion "prayer without genuine faith or desire" (c. 1600); lip-comfort (1630s).
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lipped (adj.)
"having lips or a lip," late 14c., past-participle adjective from lip (v.).
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lipless (adj.)
c. 1400, from lip (n.) + -less. Related: Liplessly.
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lippy (adj.)
"insolent, full of 'lip,'" 1875, from lip (n.) + -y (2). Related: Lippiness.
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