Etymology
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linear (adj.)

"resembling a line, of or pertaining to lines," 1640s, from French linéaire, from Latin linearis "belonging to a line," from linea "string, line" (see line (n.)). Essentially the same word as lineal; "in Latin linearis the original suffix -alis was changed to -aris by dissimilation, but in Late Latin this rule was no longer productive and the formation or re-formation in -alis remained unchanged." [Barnhart].

As "involving the use of lines" from 1840, hence Linear A, Linear B, names given (1902-3) to two related forms of linear Minoan writing discovered 1894-1901 in Crete by Sir Arthur Evans and long defying translation. It is used there in opposition to pictographic.

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non-linear (adj.)

also nonlinear, "not linear," in any sense, 1844, from non- + linear.

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bilinear (adj.)
also bi-linear, "of or having reference to two lines," 1847, from Modern Latin (in botany); see bi- "two" + linear. Related: Bilinearly; bilinearity.
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collinear (adj.)

1863, "lying in the same straight line," from col- + linear. Earlier it meant "lying in the same plane."

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lineal (adj.)
late 14c., "resembling a line," from Old French lineal "pertaining to a line" (14c.), from Late Latin linealis "pertaining to a line," from linea "a string, line, thread" (see line (n.)). Compare linear. Related: Lineally.
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interlinear (adj.)
late 14c., "situated between the lines," from Medieval Latin interlinearis "that which is between the lines," from inter "between" (see inter-) + Latin linearis (see linear). Meaning "having interpolated lines" is from 1620s. Related: Interlineary.
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multilineal (adj.)

also multi-lineal, "having many lines," 1800, from multi- + lineal. Multi-linear is by 1815.

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survey (v.)
c. 1400, "to consider, contemplate," from Anglo-French surveier, Old French sorveoir "look (down) at, look upon, notice; guard, watch," from Medieval Latin supervidere "oversee, inspect," from Latin super "over" (see super-) + videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Meaning "examine the condition of" is from mid-15c. That of "to take linear measurements of a tract of ground" is recorded from 1540s. Related: Surveyed; surveying; surveyance (late 14c.).
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handful (n.)
Old English handful "as much as can be held in the open hand;" see hand (n.) + -ful. Also a linear measurement of four inches, a handbreadth (early 15c.). Meaning "a small portion or part" is from mid-15c. Figurative meaning "as much as one can manage" is from 1755; figurative expression have (one's) hands full "have enough to do" is from late 15c. Plural handfulls. Similar formation in German handvoll, Danish haanfuld.
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