Etymology
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likely (adj.)

c. 1300, "having the appearance of truth or fact," perhaps from Old Norse likligr "likely," from likr "like" (see like (adj.)). Old English had cognate geliclic. Meaning "having the appearance of being strong and capable" is from mid-15c., though now mostly confined to American English; according to OED this sense is perhaps influenced by like (v.). Sense of "good-looking" ("such as may be liked") is from late 15c. Meaning "probable" is attested from late 14c., but said by OED to be now principally in American English. As an adverb, late 14c., from the adjective.

LIKELY. That may be liked; that may please; handsome. In the United States, as a colloquial term, respectable; worthy of esteem; sensible.—Worcester. [Bartlett]
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unlikely (adv.)
mid-15c., "improbably," from un- (1) "not" + likely (adv.) (see likely (adj.)).
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likeliness (n.)
late 14c., "resemblance," also "probability," from likely + -ness.
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likelihood (n.)
late 14c., "resemblance, similarity," from likely + -hood. Meaning "probability, state of being like or probable" is from mid-15c.
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unlikely (adj.)
late 14c., "not likely to occur," from un- (1) "not" + likely (adj.). Similar formation in Old Norse ulikligr, Middle Danish uligelig. Meaning "not likely to be true" is recorded from 1590s. Related: Unlikeliness; unlikelihood.
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confrontational (adj.)

"characterized by or likely to cause confrontation," 1969, from confrontation + -al (1). Related: Confrontationally.

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Tiber 
river through Rome, likely from Celtic dubro "river" (compare Dover). Related: Tiburtine.
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thunderhead (n.)
"high-piled cumulus cloud," one likely to develop into a thunderstorm, 1861, from thunder (n.) + head (n.).
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thankless (adj.)
"likely to not be rewarded with thanks," 1540s, from thank + -less. Related: Thanklessly; thanklessness.
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lifelike (adj.)
1610s, "likely to live," from life (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "exactly like the living original" is from 1725.
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