Etymology
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lignite (n.)
"imperfectly formed coal," 1808, from French, from Latin lignum "wood" (see ligni-). Brown coal that still shows traces of the wood it once was. Probably directly from Lithanthrax Lignius, name given to woody coal by Swedish chemist Johan Gottschalk Wallerius (1709-1785) in 1775.
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jet (n.2)
also jetstone, "deep black lignite," mid-14c., from Anglo-French geet, Old French jaiet "jet, lignite" (12c., Modern French jais), from Latin gagates, from Greek gagates lithos "stone of Gages," town and river in Lycia in Asia Minor. Formerly supposed to be magnetic. From mid-15c. as "a deep, rich, glossy black color" (the color of jet) and as an adjective.
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