Etymology
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lied (n.)
"German romantic song," 1852, from German Lied (plural Lieder), literally "song," from Middle High German liet, from Old High German liod, from Proto-Germanic *leuthan, from a PIE echoic root (see laud). Hence Liederkranz "German singing society," from German, literally "garland of songs."
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Nibelungenlied (n.)
German epic poem of 13c., literally "song of the Nibelungs," a race of dwarves who lived in Norway and owned a hoard of gold and a magic ring, literally "children of the mist," from Proto-Germanic *nibulunga-, a suffixed patronymic form from *nebla- (source of Old High German nebul "mist, fog, darkness," Old English nifol), from PIE root *nebh- "cloud." With lied "song" (see Lied).
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volkslied (n.)
"folk-song," 1858, from German Volkslied, from Volk "people" (see folk (n.)) + Lied "song" (see laud (v.)).
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Horst Wessel 
name of a Nazi activist and SA bandleader (1907-1930), author in 1929 of the lyrics to what became the German Nazi party anthem, known after as the Horst-Wessel-Lied ("Horst Wessel Song").
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laud (v.)
"praise highly, sing the praises of," late 14c., from Old French lauder "to praise, extol," from Latin laudare "to praise, commend, honor, extol, eulogize," from laus (genitive laudis) "praise, fame, glory." Probably from an echoic PIE root *leu- and cognate with Old English leoð "song, poem, hymn," from Proto-Germanic *leuthan (source also of Old Norse ljoð "strophe," German Lied "song," Gothic liuþon "to praise"). Related: Lauded; lauding.
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