Etymology
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lid (n.)

"movable or removable cover for a pot, etc.," mid-13c., from Old English hlid "covering, opening, gate," from Proto-Germanic *hlidan "a cover," literally "that which bends over" (source also of Old Norse hlið "gate, gap," Swedish lid "gate," Old French hlid, Middle Dutch lit, Dutch lid, Old High German hlit "lid, cover"), from PIE *klito-, from root *klei- "to lean."

Meaning "eyelid" is from early 13c. Slang sense of "hat, cap" is attested from 1896. As a measure of marijuana, one ounce, 1967, presumably the amount of dried weed that would fit in some commercial jar lid. Slang phrase put a lid on "clamp down on, silence, end" is from 1906; many figurative senses are from the image of a pot boiling over.

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lidded (adj.)
"having a lid" (of a specified kind), Old English gehlidod, a past-participle form, but no verb *hlidan is attested. See lid (n.).
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eyelid (n.)
mid-13c., from eye (n.) + lid (n.).
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lidless (adj.)
1520s, from lid in the "eyelid" sense + -less; usually poetic, "sleepless, ever-vigilant," as if incapable of closing the eyes.
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*klei- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to lean."

It forms all or part of: acclivity; anticline; clemency; client; climate; climax; cline; clinic; clinical; clino-; clitellum; clitoris; decline; declivity; enclitic; heteroclite; incline; ladder; lean (v.); lid; low (n.2) "small hill, eminence;" matroclinous; patroclinous; polyclinic; proclitic; proclivity; recline; synclinal; thermocline.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit srayati "leans," sritah "leaning;" Old Persian cay "to lean;" Lithuanian šlyti "to slope," šlieti "to lean;" Latin clinare "to lean, bend," clivus "declivity," inclinare "cause to bend," declinare "bend down, turn aside;" Greek klinein "to cause to slope, slant, incline;" Old Irish cloin "crooked, wrong;" Middle Irish cle, Welsh cledd "left," literally "slanting").

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operculum (n.)

"a lid or cover; an organic structure like a lid, flap, or cover," 1713, from Latin operculum "cover, lid," from operire "to cover, close," from PIE compound *op-wer-yo-, from *op- "over" (see epi-) + root *wer- (4) "to cover." With instrumental suffix *-tlom. Related: Opercular.

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lith (n.)
"joint, limb of the body" (now obsolete or provincial), Old English liþ "limb, member, joint," cognate with Old Frisian lith, Dutch lid, Old High German lid, Old Norse liðr, Gothic liþus, and, compounded with ga-, German glied "limb, member." Lith and limb was a Middle English alliterative pairing.
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pepper-box (n.)

"small box with a perforated lid, used for sprinkling ground pepper on food," 1540s, from pepper (n.) + box (n.1). Meaning "hot-tempered person" is by 1867.

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autoclave (n.)

"stewing apparatus the lid of which is kept closed and tight by the steam itself," 1847, from French (1821), literally "self-locking," from auto- "self" (see auto-) + clave, from Latin clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook").

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propitiatory (adj.)

"having the power or intent to effect propitiation," 1550s, from Late Latin propitiatorius "atoning, reconciling," from propitiatus, past participle of propitiare "appease, propitiate" (see propitiation). Earlier in English as a noun, propiciatorie, c. 1300, "the mercy seat, lid or cover of the ark of the covenant," from Late Latin propitiatorium (translating Greek hilasterion in Bible); noun use of neuter singular of propitiatorius.

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