Etymology
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liberate (v.)
"set free, release from restraint or bondage," 1620s, from Latin liberatus, past participle of liberare "to set free" (source also of Spanish librar, French livrer), from liber "free, not a slave, unrestricted" (see liberal (adj.)). Meaning "to free an occupied territory from the enemy" (often used ironically) is from 1942; hence the World War II slang sense "to loot." Related: Liberated; liberating.
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liberator (n.)
1640s, from Latin liberator "one who sets free, a deliverer" (source also of French libérateur, Spanish liberador, Italian liberatore), agent noun from past participle stem of liberare "to set free" (see liberate).
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livery (n.)
c. 1300, "household allowance of any kind (food, provisions, clothing) to retainers or servants," from Anglo-French livere (late 13c.; Old French liveree, Modern French livrée), "allowance, ration, pay," originally "(clothes) delivered by a master to his retinue," from fem. past participle of livrer "to dispense, deliver, hand over," from Latin liberare "to set free" (see liberate).

The sense later was reduced to "servants' rations" and "provender for horses" (mid-15c.). The former led to the meaning "distinctive clothing given to servants" (early 14c.); the latter now is obsolete, unless livery stable (1705) survives. Related: Liveried.
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unchain (v.)
1580s, from un- (2) "opposite of" + chain (v.). Figurative sense of "to liberate" is recorded from 1793. Related: Unchained; unchaining.
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disenthrall (v.)

"liberate from bondage or servitude, free from what holds in mental or physical subjection," 1640s, from dis- + enthrall. Related: Disenthralled; disenthralling; disenthrallment.

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expedite (v.)

"to remove impediments to the movement or progress of, accelerate the motion or progress of, hasten, quicken," 1610s, from Latin expeditus, past participle of expedire "extricate, disengage, liberate; procure, make ready, put in order, make fit, prepare; explain, make clear," literally "free the feet from fetters," hence to liberate from difficulties, from ex "out" (see ex-) + *pedis "fetter, chain for the feet," related to pes (genitive pedis) "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Compare Greek pede "fetter." Related: Expedited; expediting.

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Deo vindice 

Latin, "(with) God (as our) defender," national motto of the Confederate States of America, from ablative of Deus "God" (see Zeus) + ablative of present participle of  vindicare "to liberate; to act as avenger; protect, defend" (see vindication).

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vindicate (v.)
1620s, "to avenge or revenge," from Latin vindicatus, past participle of vindicare "to stake a claim; to liberate; to act as avenger" (see vindication). Meaning "to clear from censure or doubt, by means of demonstration" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Vindicated, vindicating.
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free (v.)
Old English freogan "to free, liberate, manumit," also "to love, think of lovingly, honor;" also "to rid (of something)," from freo "not in bondage" (see free (adj.)). The forking sense in the Germanic adjective is reflected in the verbs that grew from it in the daughter languages. Compare Old Frisian fria "to make free;" Old Saxon friohan "to court, woo;" German befreien "to free," freien "to woo;" Old Norse frja "to love;" Gothic frijon "to love." Related: Freed; freeing.
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deliberative (adj.)

1550s, "pertaining to deliberation," from French délibératif or directly from Latin deliberativus "pertaining to deliberation," from past-participle stem of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Meaning "characterized by deliberation" is by 1650s. Related: Deliberatively; deliberativeness.

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