Etymology
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lewd (adj.)
Middle English leued, from Old English læwede "nonclerical, unlearned," of uncertain origin but according to OED probably ultimately from Vulgar Latin *laigo-, from Late Latin laicus "belonging to the people" (see lay (adj.)).

Sense of "unlettered, uneducated" (early 13c.) descended to "coarse, vile, lustful" by late 14c. In Middle English often paired alliteratively with learned. It also was a noun in Old English, "layman;" for nouns, Elizabethan English made lewdster, lewdsby. Related: Lewdly; lewdness.
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nice (adj.)
Origin and meaning of nice

late 13c., "foolish, ignorant, frivolous, senseless," from Old French nice (12c.) "careless, clumsy; weak; poor, needy; simple, stupid, silly, foolish," from Latin nescius "ignorant, unaware," literally "not-knowing," from ne- "not" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + stem of scire "to know" (see science). "The sense development has been extraordinary, even for an adj." [Weekley] -- from "timid, faint-hearted" (pre-1300); to "fussy, fastidious" (late 14c.); to "dainty, delicate" (c. 1400); to "precise, careful" (1500s, preserved in such terms as a nice distinction and nice and early); to "agreeable, delightful" (1769); to "kind, thoughtful" (1830).

In many examples from the 16th and 17th centuries it is difficult to say in what particular sense the writer intended it to be taken. [OED]

By 1926, it was pronounced "too great a favorite with the ladies, who have charmed out of it all its individuality and converted it into a mere diffuser of vague and mild agreeableness." [Fowler]

"I am sure," cried Catherine, "I did not mean to say anything wrong; but it is a nice book, and why should I not call it so?" "Very true," said Henry, "and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very nice walk; and you are two very nice young ladies. Oh! It is a very nice word indeed! It does for everything." [Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey," 1803]

For sense evolution, compare fond, innocent, lewd, also silly.

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wanton (n.)
"one who is ill-behaved," mid-15c., especially "lascivious, lewd person" (1520s), from wanton (adj.).
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coltish (adj.)

late 14c., "wild, frisky," also in early use "lustful, lewd," from colt + -ish. Literal sense of "pertaining to a colt" is recorded from 1540s. Related: Coltishly.

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giglot (n.)
"lewd, wanton woman" (mid-14c.); later "a giddy, romping girl;" of unknown origin; compare gig (n.1).
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lecherous (adj.)

"prone to indulge in sensuality, lustful, lewd," c. 1300, probably from lecher + -ous; or else from rare Old French adjective lecheros. The nativized form is lickerish. Related: Lecherously; lecherousness.

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bawdry (n.)
late 14c., "pandering, business of a procuress," probably from Old French bauderie "boldness, ardor, elation, pride," from baud (see bawd). From 1580s as "obscenity, smuttiness, lewd language."
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sensual (adj.)

early 15c., "carnal, unspiritual;" mid-15c., "of or pertaining to the senses," from Old French sensuel (15c.) and directly from Late Latin sensualis "endowed with feeling" (see sensuality). Meaning "connected with gratification of the senses," especially "lewd, unchaste" is attested from late 15c.

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priapism (n.)

"morbidly persistent erection of the penis," 1620s, from Late Latin priapismus, from Greek priapismos (also "lewdness"), from priapizein "to be lewd," from Priapos, the name of the god of male reproductive power. See priapic + -ism.

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lubric (adj.)

late 15c., "smooth, slippery," also "lascivious, lewd," from French lubrique (15c.) or directly from Latin lubricus "slippery," figuratively "seductive," from PIE root *sleubh- "to slip, slide." Related: Lubrical.

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