Etymology
Advertisement
lens (n.)

1690s, "glass to regulate light rays," from Latin lens (genitive lentis) "a lentil," on analogy of the double-convex shape. See lentil. Anatomical use, of the eye part, from 1719. Lens-cap is from 1857.

In the vernacular of the photographer, anyone crowding to the front of a group, staring into the lens, or otherwise attracting attention to himself is known as a "lens louse." ["American Photography," vol. xl, 1946; the term dates from 1915]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lenticular (adj.)
"lens-shaped, having the form of a double-convex lens," early 15c., from Late Latin lenticularis "lentil-shaped," from lenticula "a small lentil," diminutive of Latin lens "a lentil" (see lentil). Related: Lenticularity (1890).
Related entries & more 
Panavision (n.)

1955, proprietary name of a type of wide-screen lens, a word formed from elements of panorama + vision.

Related entries & more 
eye-piece (n.)

also eyepiece, "the lens or combination of lenses to which the eye is applied in an optical instrument," 1738, from eye (n.) + piece (n.1).

Related entries & more 
macrophotography (n.)

"photography of objects at or larger than actual size without the use of a magnifying lens," 1863, from macro- + photography.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
magnifier (n.)

1540s, "one who or that which enlarges," agent noun from magnify. Specifically as "a magnifying lens" by 1660s.

Related entries & more 
pin-hole (n.)

"small hole made by the puncture of a pin," 1670s, from pin (n.) + hole (n.). By 1891 in reference to a type of camera using a pin-hole in place of a lens.

Related entries & more 
Schmidt (n.)
type of astronomical telescope lens used for photography, 1939, from Estonian-born German optician Bernhard Voldemar Schmidt (1879-1935), who invented it.
Related entries & more 
shutter (n.)
1540s, "one who shuts" (see shut (v.)); meaning "movable wooden or iron screen for a window" is from 1680s. Photographic sense of "device for opening and closing the aperture of a lens" is from 1862.
Related entries & more 
zoom (v.)
1886, of echoic origin. Gained popularity c. 1917 as aviators began to use it. As a noun from 1917. The photographer's zoom lens is from 1936, from the specific aviation sense of zoom as "to quickly move closer."
Related entries & more