Etymology
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Lenape 
1728, from the Unami Delaware (Algonquian) native designation, said to mean literally "original person," from /len-/ "ordinary, real, original" + /-a:p:e/ "person." Sometimes in extended form Lenni Lenape, with /leni-/ "real."
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lenient (adj.)

1650s, "relaxing, soothing" (a sense now archaic), from French lenient, from Latin lenientem (nominative leniens), present participle of lenire "to soften, alleviate, allay; calm, soothe, pacify," from lenis "mild, gentle, calm," which probably is from a suffixed form of PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken."

The usual modern sense of "mild, merciful" (of persons or actions) is first recorded 1787. In earlier use was lenitive, attested from early 15c. of medicines, 1610s of persons. Related: Leniently.

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lengthy (adj.)

"having length" (especially "immoderately long"), 1759, American English, from length + -y (2). Until c. 1840 always characterized in British English as an Americanism.

This word has been very common among us, both in writing and in the language of conversation; but it has been so much ridiculed by Americans as well as Englishmen, that in writing it is now generally avoided. Mr. Webster has admitted it into his dictionary; but as need hardly be remarked it is not in any of the English ones. It is applied by us, as Mr. Webster justly observes, chiefly to writings or discourses. Thus we say, a lengthy pamphlet, a lengthy sermon, &c. The English would say, a long or (in the more familiar style) a longish sermon. [John Pickering, "A Vocabulary, or Collection of Words and Phrases Which Have Been Supposed to be Peculiar to the United States of America," Boston, 1816]

Related: Lengthily; lengthiness.

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money-lender (n.)

"one who lends money on interest," 1765, from money + lender.

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arms-length (n.)
"space equal to the length of a human arm," 1650s, from arm (n.1) + length. Figurative at arm's end is recorded from 1570s.
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lenticular (adj.)
"lens-shaped, having the form of a double-convex lens," early 15c., from Late Latin lenticularis "lentil-shaped," from lenticula "a small lentil," diminutive of Latin lens "a lentil" (see lentil). Related: Lenticularity (1890).
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lengthwise (adv.)
"in the direction of the length," 1570s, from length + wise (n.). As an adjective by 1871.
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lend (n.)
"a loan," 1570s, from lend (v.). OED describes it as Scottish and Northern.
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Lena 
fem. proper name, originally a shortened form of Helena or Magdalena.
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Lennon 
A recurring visual feature of the [Hong Kong] protests has been the so-called Lennon Walls, where people have posted hundreds or even thousands of slogans — mostly on Post-it notes — in public spaces across the city.
Their name comes from a wall in Prague where tributes to John Lennon appeared after the former Beatle’s killing in 1980. It evolved into a place where young Czechs expressed support for democracy and aired grievances against the Communist regime ruling Czechoslovakia. ["Fueling the Hong Kong Protests: A World of Pop-Culture Memes," New York Times, Aug. 2, 2019] 
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