Etymology
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leather (n.)

Old English leðer (only in compounds) "tanned or otherwise dressed hide or skin of an animal," from Proto-Germanic *lethran (source also of Old Norse leðr, Old Frisian lether, Old Saxon lethar, Middle Dutch, Dutch leder, Old High German ledar, German Leder), from PIE *letro- "leather" (source also of Old Irish lethar, Welsh lledr, Breton lezr). As an adjective from early 14c.; it acquired a secondary sense of "sado-masochistic" 1980s, having achieved that status in homosexual jargon in the 1970s.

In commercial and popular usage leather does not include skins dressed with the hair or fur on: such skins are usually distinguished by compounding the word skin with the name of the animal from which they are taken: as sealskin, bearskin, otter skin, etc. In the untanned state skins valued for their fur, hair, or wool and destined to be tawed and dressed for furriers' and analogous uses, are called pelts or peltry. [Century Dictionary, 1900]
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leather-back (n.)
soft-shelled sea-turtle, 1855, from leather + back (n.). So called for its color.
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leathery (adj.)
1550s, from leather + -y (2). Related: Leatheriness.
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pleather (n.)

"artificial or synthetic leather as a material in clothing, upholstery, etc.," by 1991, from plastic + leather.

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leatherneck (n.)
"U.S. Marine," 1914, Navy slang, from leather + neck (n.). So called for the leather collars of their early uniforms; earlier in British use (1890) it was a sailor's term for a soldier.
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leatherstocking (n.)
also leather-stocking, 1701, "a sock made of leather," from leather (n.) + stocking (n.). As "a wearer of socks made of leather," usually meaning "an American frontiersman," 1823, in reference to Natty Bumppo, nicknamed "Leatherstocking," the central character in J.F. Cooper's "Leatherstocking Tales."
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leathern (adj.)
"of or like leather," Old English leðren, earlier liðerin; see leather + -en (2). Similar formation in Dutch lederen, Old High German lidirin, German ledern.
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lederhosen (n.)
leather shorts worn in Alpine regions, 1937, from German Lederhosen, literally "leather trousers" (see leather and hose (n.)). Old English had cognate leðerhose. German hosen displaced Old High German bruch, which is from the basic Germanic word for "trousers" (see breeches).
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cordwain (n.)

"Cordovan or Spanish leather," late 14c., cordewane, from Anglo-French cordewan (c. 1300), from Old French cordowan, cordoan "(leather) of Cordova," the Spanish city that produced a type of leather favored for shoes by the upper class (see cordwainer).

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coriaceous (adj.)

"resembling leather in texture, toughness, etc.," 1670s, from Late Latin coraceus, from Latin corium "skin, hide, leather" (see corium).

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