Etymology
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lavage (n.)
"a washing," 1884, from French lavage, from laver "to wash," from Latin lavare "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").
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lavish (adj.)

"spending or bestowing profusely," mid-15c., laves, from Old French lavasse,lavache (n.) "a torrent of rain, deluge" (15c.), from laver "to wash," from Latin lavare "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash"). Related: Lavishly; lavishness.

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pelvis (n.)

"basin-like cavity formed by the bones of the pelvic girdle," 1610s, from Modern Latin, from Latin pelvis "basin, laver," Old Latin peluis "basin," from PIE *pel- "container" (source also of Sanskrit palavi "vessel," Greek pelex "helmet," pelike "goblet, bowl," Old Norse and Old English full "cup").

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lave (v.)
c. 1200 (transitive), from Old English lafian "wash by pouring water on, pour (water)," possibly an early Anglo-Saxon or West Germanic borrowing (compare Dutch laven, German laben) of Latin lavare "to wash," or its Old French descendant, laver, or some confusion in English of the two. Latin lavare is from PIE root *leue- "to wash."
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