Etymology
Advertisement
larynx (n.)

"cartilaginous cavity in the upper windpipe where vocal sounds are made," 1570s, from French larynx (16c.), via medical Latin, from Greek larynx (genitive laryngos) "the upper windpipe," which is probably from laimos "throat" (a word of uncertain etymology) but influenced by pharynx "throat, windpipe" (see pharynx).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
laryngitis (n.)
"inflammation of the larynx," 1818, Medical Latin, from combining form of larynx (q.v.) + -itis "inflammation." Related: Laryngitic (1847).
Related entries & more 
laryngeal (adj.)
1795 in anatomy, "of or pertaining to the larynx," from medical Latin laryngeus (from Greek larynx, genitive laryngos, "the upper windpipe;" see larynx) + English -al (1). Sometimes spelled laryngal (1834). As a noun, in linguistics, from 1921.
Related entries & more 
lamia (n.)

female demon, late 14c., from Latin lamia "witch, sorceress, vampire," from Greek lamia "female vampire, man-eating monster," literally "swallower, lecher," from laimos "throat, gullet" (see larynx). Perhaps cognate with Latin lemures "spirits of the dead" (see lemur) and, like it, borrowed from a non-IE language. Used in early translations of the Bible for screech owls and sea monsters. In Middle English also sometimes, apparently, mermaids:

Also kynde erreþ in som beestes wondirliche j-schape, as it fareþ in a beest þat hatte lamia, þat haþ an heed as a mayde & body as a grym fissche[;] whan þat best lamya may fynde ony man, first a flatereþ wiþ hym with a wommannes face and makeþ hym ligge by here while he may dure, & whanne he may noferþere suffice to here lecherye þanne he rendeþ hym and sleþ and eteþ hym. [Bartholomew Glanville, "De proprietatibus rerum," c. 1240, translated by John of Trevisa c. 1398]
Related entries & more 
glottis (n.)

"mouth of the windpipe, opening at the top of the larynx," 1570s, from Greek glōttis "mouthpiece of a pipe," from glōtta, Attic dialect variant of glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pharynx (n.)

"musculo-membranous pouch at the back of the nasal cavities, mouth, and larynx," 1690s, from Greek pharynx (genitive pharyngos) " throat, joint opening of the windpipe," which is related to pharanx "cleft, chasm, gully, deep trench;" all of uncertain origin; Beekes suggests Pre-Greek origin. The combining form is pharyngo-, before vowels pharyng-; the Modern Latin plural is pharynges.

Related entries & more 
throat (n.)
Old English þrote (implied in þrotbolla "the Adam's apple, larynx," literally "throat boll"), related to þrutian "to swell," from Proto-Germanic *thrut- (source also of Old High German drozza, German Drossel, Old Saxon strota, Middle Dutch strote, Dutch strot "throat"), of uncertain origin. Italian strozza "throat," strozzare "to strangle" are Germanic loan-words. College slang for "competitive student" is 1970s, from cutthroat.
Related entries & more 
Adam's apple (n.)
bulge in the throat caused by the cartilage of the larynx, 1731, corresponding to Latin pomum Adami, perhaps an inexact translation of Hebrew tappuah haadam, literally "man's swelling," from ha-adam "the man" + tappuah "anything swollen." The reference is to the legend that a piece of the forbidden fruit (commonly believed to have been an apple) that Eve gave Adam stuck in his throat. It is more prominent in men than women. The term is mentioned early 15c. as the name of an actual oriental and Mediterranean fruit, a variety of lime with an indentation fancied to resemble the marks of Adam's teeth.
Related entries & more