Etymology
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landscape (n.)

c. 1600, "painting representing an extensive view of natural scenery," from Dutch landschap "landscape," in art, a secondary sense from Middle Dutch landscap "region," from land "land" (see land) + -scap "-ship, condition" (see -ship).

A painters' term; the non-artistic meaning "tract of land with its distinguishing characteristics" is an extended sense from 1886. Similar formation in Old English landscipe "region," Old High German lantscaf, German Landschaft, Old Norse landskapr, Danish landskab "a region, district, province."

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landscape (v.)

"to lay out lawns, gardens, etc., plant trees for the sake of beautification," by 1916, from landscape (n.) in its non-artistic sense. Earlier it was used in an artistic sense, "to represent in a landscape setting" (1660s). Related: Landscaped; landscaping.

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dreamscape (n.)

"landscape seen in dreams," 1858, from dream (n.) + second element abstracted from landscape, etc.

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cityscape (n.)

"a view of a city," 1856, from city + ending from landscape.

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scape (n.1)

"scenery view," 1773, abstracted from landscape (n.); -scape as a combining element in word formation is attested by 1796, in prisonscape.

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landscaping (n.)

"art of laying out grounds and arranging plants and trees for picturesque effect," by 1861, verbal noun from landscape (v.). Earlier in the same sense was landscape-gardening (1763).

The question, however, is, Can landscape-gardening (or short and sweet, landscaping) be taught? It, plainly, cannot. ["The Gardener's Monthly" July 1861]

Also, in reference to the visual arts, "depiction as a landscape" (1868).

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moonscape (n.)

"the landscape of the moon or a surface resembling it," 1926, from moon (n.) + scape (n.1).

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foreground (n.)

1690s, "part of a landscape nearest the observer," from fore- + ground (n.). First used in English by Dryden ("Art of Painting"); compare Dutch voorgrond. Figurative use by 1816.

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riverrun (n.)

"course a river shapes through a landscape," 1939, coined by Joyce; see river (n.) + run (n.).

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cyclorama (n.)

"circular panorama, picture of a landscape, battle, etc., arranged on the interior surface of a cylindrical room or other space," 1840, from cyclo- + -rama "spectacle." Related: Cycloramic.

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