Etymology
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labio- 
word-forming element in medical use since 17c., taken as a combining form of Latin labium "lip" (see lip (n.)).
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lacto- 
before vowels, lac-, word-forming element used in chemistry and physiology from 19c. and meaning "milk," from Latin lac (genitive lactis) "milk," from Proto-Italic *(g)lagt-, from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk." This and the separate root *melg- (source of milk (n.)) account for words for "milk" in most of the Indo-European languages. The absence of a common word for it is considered a mystery. Middle Irish lacht, Welsh llaeth "milk" are loan words from Latin.
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Latino- 
prefix in use from 1939 as a combining form of Latin, from ablative of Latin latinus. By 1958 as a combining form from Latino.
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latero- 

combining form used from 19c. to represent Latin latus "the side, flank of humans or animals, lateral surface," a word of uncertain origin. The Latin word also was used to express intimacy, attachment, or relationship via the notion of "attach to the side, at the side of."

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-later 
word-forming element meaning "worshipper," from Greek -latres "worshipper of," related to latreia "worship" (see -latry).
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larvi- 
word-forming element in zoology, from combining form of larva (q.v.).
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-latry 
word-forming element meaning "worship of," used as an element in native formations from 19c. (such as bardolatry), from Greek -latreia "worship, service paid to the gods, hired labor," related to latron (n.) "pay, hire," latris "servant, worshipper," from PIE *le- (1) "to get" (see larceny).
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