Advertisement
172 entries found.
Search filter: All Results 
join (v.)
c. 1300, "to unite (things) into a whole, combine, put or bring together; juxtapose," also "unite, be joined" (intrans.), from joign-, stem of Old French joindre "join, connect, unite; have sexual intercourse with" (12c.), from Latin iungere "to join together, unite, yoke," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join."

Meaning "unite, become associated, form an alliance" is from early 14c. Meaning "to unite (two persons) in marriage" is from mid-14c. Figuratively (of virtues, qualities, hearts, etc.) from late 14c. Of battles, "to begin," from late 14c. In Middle English join on (c. 1400) meant "to attack (someone), begin to fight with." Meaning "go to and accompany (someone)" is from 1713; that of "unite, form a junction with" is from 1702. Related: Joined; joining.

Join up "enlist in the army" is from 1916. Phrase if you can't beat them, join them is from 1953. To be joined at the hip figuratively ("always in close connection") is by 1986, from the literal sense in reference to "Siamese twins." In Middle English, join sometimes is short for enjoin.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
unjoin (v.)
mid-14c., from un- (2) "opposite of" + join (v.). Related: Unjoined; unjoining.
Related entries & more 
rejoin (v.1)

also re-join, 1540s, of things, intransitive, "unite again, unite after separation," from re- "again" + join (v.). Transitive sense of "join again, reunite (one thing or person to or with another)" is from 1560s. Meaning "join the company of again" is from 1610s. Related: Rejoined; rejoining.

Related entries & more 
joiner (n.)
early 14c. (late 12c. as a surname), joynour "maker of furniture, small boxes, etc.," from Old French joigneor "joiner, carpenter," agent noun from joindre "to join" (see join (v.)). A craftsman in wood who did lighter and more ornamental work; often meaning the carpenter who does the internal and external finishings of a house, ship, etc. Meaning "one who makes a habit of joining" (societies, clubs, etc.) is from 1890. Related: Joinery.
Related entries & more 
*yeug- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to join."

It forms all or part of: adjoin; adjust; conjoin; conjugal; conjugate; conjugation; conjunct; disjointed; enjoin; injunction; jugular; jostle; joust; join; joinder; joint; jointure; junction; juncture; junta; juxtapose; juxtaposition; rejoin (v.2) "to answer;" rejoinder; subjoin; subjugate; subjugation; subjunctive; syzygy; yoga; yoke; zeugma; zygoma; zygomatic; zygote.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit yugam "yoke," yunjati "binds, harnesses," yogah "union;" Hittite yugan "yoke;" Greek zygon "yoke," zeugnyanai "to join, unite;" Latin iungere "to join," iugum "yoke;" Old Church Slavonic igo, Old Welsh iou "yoke;" Lithuanian jungas "yoke," jungti "to fasten to a yoke;" Old English geoc "yoke."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
joint (adj.)
early 15c., "united or sharing" (in some activity), from Old French jointiz (adj.) "joined together, close together" and Old French joint (14c.), past-participle adjective from joindre "to join, connect, unite," from Latin iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join."
Related entries & more 
joinder (n.)
"act of joining together" (usually in specific legal senses), c. 1600, from French joindre "to join," taken as a noun, from Latin iungere "to join together, unite, yoke," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join."
Related entries & more 
jointure (n.)
late 14c., "act or fact of being joined," from Old French jointure "a putting together," from Latin iunctura "a joining, juncture," from iunctus, past participle of iungere "to join together," from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join." Specific legal sense is from mid-15c.: "estate or property settled on an intended husband and wife, meant as a provision for the latter."
Related entries & more 
conjunct (adj.)

"conjoined, conjoint," mid-15c., from Latin coniunctus, past participle of coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). A doublet of conjoint.

Related entries & more 
conjoin (v.)

late 14c., "to join together, unite; form a union or league," from Old French conjoindre "meet, come together" (12c.), from Latin coniungere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join"). Related: Conjoined, conjoining. Conjoined in reference to "Siamese twins" is recorded from 1749.

Related entries & more