Etymology
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johnson (n.)
"penis," 1863, perhaps related to British slang John Thomas, which has the same meaning (1887).
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postponement (n.)

"act of deferring to a future time," 1770, from postpone + -ment. Johnson (1755) has postponence.

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prettiness (n.)

"Beauty without dignity; neat elegance without elevation" [Johnson], 1520s, from pretty (adj.) + -ness.

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latterly (adv.)
1734, from latter (adj.) + -ly (2). Called by Johnson [1755] "a low word lately hatched." Related: Lattermost.
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width (n.)
1620s, formed from wide on model of breadth, and replacing wideness (Old English widnes). Johnson (1755) calls it "a low word." Related: Widthwise.
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sectarianism (n.)
1670s, "disposition to petty sects in opposition to things established" [Johnson]; see sectarian + -ism.
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chop-house (n.)
1680s, "a mean house of entertainment, where provision ready dressed is sold" [Johnson], from chop (n.) in the "meat" sense + house (n.).
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enow (adj., n.)
Old English genoge (plural adjective), from genog (see enough). By Johnson, regarded as the plural of enough.
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punster (n.)

1700, "a low wit who endeavours at reputation by double meaning" [Johnson], "one who puns or is skilled in punning," from pun + -ster.

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mother (n.2)

"a thick substance concreting in liquors; the lees or scum concreted" [Johnson], 1530s, probably from Middle Dutch modder "filth, dregs," from PIE *meu- (see mud).

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