Etymology
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Jean 
masc. proper name, French equivalent of John (q.v.). The fem. proper name is from the French equivalent of Jane. Related: Jeanette.
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jean (n.)

"twilled cotton cloth," mid-15c., Geayne, short for Gene fustian, from French jean fustian "fustian (a type of twilled cotton cloth) of Genoa," the Italian city, from Old French Jannes "Genoa," from Latin Genua (see Genoa). Compare obsolete jane, name of a small silver coin of Genoa that circulated in England 15c. The plural form jeans became standard by mid-19c. In the sense "trousers made of jeans" it is attested by 1908; noted as characteristic of teenagers from 1959. Not originally blue.

After sheep could be protected from the wolves, the people fared better in the matter of clothing. Flannel and linsey were woven for the wear of women and children, while jeans was woven for the men. For want of other dye-stuffs, the wool for the jeans was almost invariably colored with the bark or young shoots of the walnut; hence the inevitable "butternut" worn so extensively in the West for many years. ["History of Menard and Mason Counties, Illinois," 1879]
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blue-jeans (n.)
from 1843 as a type of fabric; see blue (adj.1) + jean. As short for blue-jeans trousers, from 1878.
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mycosis (n.)

"the presence of fungi as parasites in the body," 1841, from French (Jean-Louis Alibert, 1835); medical Latin; see myco- + -osis. Related: Mycotic.

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Cointreau (n.)

orange-flavored liqueur, named for founders Adolphe and Edouard-Jean Cointreau, brothers from Angers, France, who set up Cointreau Distillery in 1849. The liqueur dates from 1875.

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Seychelles 
renamed 1756 in honor of French finance minister Jean Moreau de Séchelles; spelling altered 1794 by the English when they took the islands from France. Related: Seychellois.
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Trappist (n.)
1814, from French trappiste, Cistercian monk of reformed order established 1664 by Armand Jean le Bouthillier de Rancé (1626-1700) of La Trappe in Normandy.
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pneumothorax (n.)

"presence of air in the pleural cavity," 1821, from French pneumothorax (1803), coined by French physician Jean Marc Gaspard Itard (1774-1838) from Greek pneumon "lung" (see pneumo-) + thorax.

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baud (n.)
1932, originally a unit of speed in telegraphy, coined in French in 1929 in honor of French inventor and engineer Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903), who designed a telegraph printing system.
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