Etymology
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zoot suit (n.)

1942, American English slang, the first element probably a nonsense reduplication of suit (compare reet pleat, drape shape from the same jargon).

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double talk (n.)

"deliberately unintelligible speech," by 1938, from double (adj.) + talk (n.). Old English had a similar formation in twispræc "double speech, deceit, detraction." An analysis of Chinook jargon from 1913 lists mox wawa "a lie," literally "double talk."

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skid row (n.)

place where vagabonds, low-lifes, and out-of-work men gather in a town, 1921, with reference to Seattle, a variant of skid road "track of skids along which logs are rolled" (1851); see skid (n.). The sense was extended to "part of town inhabited by loggers" (1906), then, in the jargon of hobos, to "disreputable district" (1915), perhaps also suggested by the notion of going downhill.

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deep six (n.)

"place where something is discarded," by 1921 (in phrase give (something) the deep six), originally in motorboating slang, perhaps from earlier underworld noun sense of "the grave" (1929), which is perhaps a reference to the usual grave depth of six feet. But the phrase (in common with mark twain) also figured in sailing jargon, of sounding, for a measure of six fathoms:

As the water deepened under her keel the boyish voice rang out from the chains: "By the mark five—and a quarter less six—by the deep six—and a half seven—by the deep eight—and a quarter eight." ["Learning the Road to Sea," in Outing magazine, February 1918]

In general use by 1940s. As a verb from 1953.

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male chauvinist (adj.)

by 1936; popular from 1969 (with added pig (n.) by 1970); a specialized use of chauvinism, which in late 19c. international Communist Party jargon was extended to racism and in the next generation to sexism:

In this era, inspired by the CP's struggle against racism, women in the CP coined the term male chauvinism, in a parallel with white chauvinism, to derogate the conviction of men that they were better than women. [Jane Mansbridge and Katherine Flaster, "Male Chauvinist, Feminist, and Sexual Harassment, Different Trajectories in Feminist Linguistic Innovation," "American Speech," vol. lxxx, no. 3, Fall 2005]

Related: Male-chauvinism (1969).

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