Etymology
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Japan 
1570s, via Portuguese Japao, Dutch Japan, acquired in Malacca from Malay (Austronesian) Japang, from Chinese jih pun, literally "sunrise" (equivalent of Japanese Nippon), from jih "sun" + pun "origin." Japan lies to the east of China. Earliest form in Europe was Marco Polo's Chipangu.
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japan (v.)
"to coat with lacquer or varnish" in the manner of Japanese lacquer-work, 1680s, from Japan. Related: japanned; japanning. Hence also japonaiserie (1896, from French). Japanned work being generally black, japanned took on a slang sense of "ordained into the priesthood."
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Japanesque (adj.)
1853, from Japan + -esque. In reference to aesthetics inspired by Japanese influence.
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japonica (n.)
"camellia," 1819, Modern Latin, fem. of japonicus "Japanese, of Japan," from Japon, a variant of Japan with a vowel closer to the Japanese name.
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Japanese (adj.)
1580s, Iapones; see Japan + -ese. As a noun from c. 1600; meaning "the Japanese language" is from 1828. As nouns Purchas has Iaponite (1613), Hakluyt Japonian. The destructive Japanese beetle attested from 1919, accidentally introduced in U.S. 1916 in larval stage in a shipment of Japanese iris.
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Japlish (n.)
"unidiomatic English in Japan," 1960, from Japanese + English.
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Genro (n.)
"elder statesman of Japan," 1876, from Japanese, literally "first elders."
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VJ day (n.)
also V-J Day, "Victory in Japan Day," 1944; it shares an origin with VE Day.
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daimyo 

also daimio, former title of the chief feudal nobles of Japan, vassals of the mikado, 1839, from Japanese, literally "big name," from Chinese dai "great" + mio, myo "name."

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trilateral (adj.)
1650s, from Late Latin trilaterus "three-sided;" see tri- + lateral. The Trilateral Commission (representing Japan, the U.S., and Europe) was founded 1973. Related: Trilateralism; trilaterally.
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