Etymology
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item (n.)
late 14c., originally an adverb, "moreover, in addition," from Latin item (adv.) "likewise, just so, moreover," probably from ita "thus," id "it" (see id) + adverbial ending -tem (compare idem "the same").

The Latin adverb was used to introduce a new fact or statement, and in French and English it was used before every article in an enumeration (such as an inventory or bill). This practice led to the noun sense "an article of any kind" (1570s). Meaning "detail of information" (especially in a newspaper) is from 1819; item "sexually linked unmarried couple" is 1970, probably from notion of being an item in the gossip columns.
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itemize (v.)

"state by items, give the particulars of," 1833 (implied in itemized), American English, from item + -ize. Related: Itemizing. An earlier verb was item "make a note of" (c. 1600).

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agendum (n.)
"an item on an agenda;" see agenda.
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widget (n.)
"gadget, small manufactured item," c. 1920, American English, probably an alteration of gadget, perhaps based on which it.
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bijou (n.)
"small item of ornamental jewelry," 1660s, from French bijou, which according to OED is probably from Breton bizou "(jeweled) ring," from bez "finger" (compare Cornish bisou "finger-ring," 13c.). Related: Bijouterie.
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everything (n.)

"all things, taken separately; any total or aggregate considered with reference to its constituent parts; each separate item or particular," late 14c., from every + thing. Colloquially, "something of extreme importance," by 1889.

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de-accession (v.)

also deaccession, "remove an entry for an item from the register of a museum, library, etc." (often a euphemism for "to sell"), by 1968, from de- "off, away" + accession, which had been used since 1887 in library publications as a verb meaning "to add to a catalogue." Related: De-accessioned; de-accessioning.

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whatnot (n.)
also what-not, 1530s, "anything," from what + not. Elliptical for "what may I not say," implying "everything else." As the name of a furniture item, first attested 1808, so named for the objects it is meant to hold.
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rockabilly (n.)

type of popular music blending elements of rock 'n' roll and hillbilly music, 1956, from rock (n.2) in the music sense + second element abstracted from hillbilly music. One of the first uses is in a Billboard magazine item about Johnny Burnette's "Lonesome Train."

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pointer (n.)

mid-14c., "a tiler" (early 13c. as a surname), agent noun from point (v.). From c. 1500 as "maker of needlepoint lace." From 1570s as "thing that points;" meaning "dog that stands rigid in the presence of game, facing the quarry" is recorded from 1717. Meaning "item of advice" is recorded by 1883.

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