Etymology
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Italy 
from Latin Italia, from Greek Italia; of unknown origin. Perhaps an alteration of Oscan Viteliu "Italy," but meaning originally only the southwestern point of the peninsula. Traditionally said to be from Vitali, name of a tribe that settled in Calabria, whose name is perhaps somehow connected with Latin vitulus "calf." Or perhaps the country name is directly from vitulus as "land of cattle," or it might be from an Illyrian word, or an ancient or legendary ruler Italus. The modern nation dates from events of 1859-60 and was completed by the addition of Venetia in 1866 and Rome in 1870.
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Italiot (adj.)
also Italiote, of or belonging to the ancient Greek settlements in southern Italy," 1650s, from Greek Italiotes, from Italia (see Italy).
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Italian (n.)
early 15c., "native of Italy," from Italian Italiano, from Italia "Italy" (see Italy). Meaning "the Italian language" is late 14c. As an adjective from 1510s. Earlier the Italians were the Italies (late 14c.).
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Italic (adj.)
"of or pertaining to ancient Italy," 1680s, from Latin Italicus, from Italia (see Italy). A word of historians and antiquarians. Earlier in the sense "pertaining to the Greek colonies in southern Italy" (1660s) and as the name of one of the orders of classical architecture (1560s).
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italic (adj.)

"type of printing with lines sloping to the right," 1610s, from Latin italicus "Italian, of Italy," from Italia (see Italy). So called because it was introduced in 1501 by Aldus Manutius, printer of Venice (who also gave his name to Aldine), and first used in his edition of Virgil, which was dedicated to Italy. As a noun, "italic type," 1670s.

[Italics] pull up the reader and tell him not to read heedlessly on, or he will miss some peculiarity in the italicized word. [Fowler]

Earlier (1570s) the word was used in English for the plain, sloping style of handwriting (opposed to gothic), and italic printing sometimes in English was called cursive (and also Aldine). Often, but not always, for emphasis; in manuscripts indicated by an underscored line. Related: Italics.

The Italic words in the Old and New Testament are those, which have no corresponding words in the original Hebrew or Greek; but are added by the translators, to complete or explain the sense. [Joseph Robertson, "An Essay on Punctuation," 1785]
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Risorgimento (n.)

movement which culminated in the unification and independence of Italy, 1889, from Italian, literally "uprising" (of Italy against Austria, c. 1850-60), from risorgere, from Latin resurgere "rise again, lift oneself, be restored" (see resurgent).

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Po 
large river in northern Italy, from Latin Padus, a name of Celtic origin.
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Lombardy 

region and former kingdom (overthrown 744 by Charlemagne) in northern Italy; see Lombard. Lombardy poplar for the tall, columnar or spire-shaped variety, originally from Italy but planted in North American colonies as an ornamental tree, is attested from 1766.

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Calabria 
region of southern Italy, named for a people who once lived there. Related: Calabrian; Calabrese.
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Verona 
city in northern Italy, Celtic Vernomago, from verno "elder tree" + mago "field, place." Related: Veronese.
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