Etymology
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isometric (adj.)
1838, literally "of the same measure," from iso- "the same, equal" + -metric. The components are Greek: isos "equal, identical" + metron "a measure." Originally a method of using perspective in drawing; later in reference to crystals. The physiological sense relating to muscular action is from 1889, from German isometrisch in this sense (1882).
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isometrics (n.)
as a type of exercise, 1962, American English, from isometric; also see -ics.
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anisometric (adj.)
"of unequal measurement," 1850, perhaps based on German anisometrisch (by 1836); see an- (1) "not" + isometric.
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isometry (n.)
in mathematics, 1941, probably from isometric (q.v.) on the model of geometry/geometric.
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*me- (2)
*mē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to measure." Some words may belong instead to root *med- "to take appropriate measures."

It forms all or part of: amenorrhea; centimeter; commensurate; diameter; dimension; gematria; geometry; immense; isometric; meal (n.1) "food, time for eating;" measure; menarche; meniscus; menopause; menses; menstrual; menstruate; mensural; meter (n.1) "poetic measure;" meter (n.2) unit of length; meter (n.3) "device for measuring;" -meter; Metis; metric; metrical; metronome; -metry; Monday; month; moon; parameter; pentameter; perimeter; piecemeal; semester; symmetry; thermometer; trigonometry; trimester.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mati "measures," matra "measure;" Avestan, Old Persian ma- "to measure;" Greek metron "measure," metra "lot, portion;" Latin metri "to measure."
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iso- 
before vowels often is-, word-forming element meaning "equal, similar, identical; isometric," from Greek isos "equal to, the same as; equally divided; fair, impartial (of persons); even, level (of ground)," as in isometor "like one's mother." In English used properly only with words of Greek origin; the Latin equivalent is equi- (see equi-).
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