Etymology
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-stan 
place-name element in Afghanistan, Pakistan, etc., from Persian -stan "country," from Indo-Iranian *stanam "place," literally "where one stands," from PIE *sta-no-, suffixed form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."
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-osis 
word-forming element expressing state or condition, in medical terminology denoting "a state of disease," from Latin -osis and directly from Greek -osis, formed from the aorist of verbs ending in -o. It corresponds to Latin -atio.
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-ization 
word-forming element making nouns of action, process, or state; see -ize + -ation.
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-dom 

abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom "statute, judgment" (see doom (n.)). Originally an independent word, but already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom). "Jurisdiction," hence "province, state, condition, quality."

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-escence 
word-forming element meaning "process or state of being," from Latin -escentia, from -escentem (see -escent).
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-acy 
word-forming element making nouns of quality, state, or condition, a confusion in English of three similar suffixes from Latin: 1. in primacy, etc., from Old French -acie and directly from Medieval Latin -acia, Late Latin -atia, making nouns of quality, state, or condition from nouns in -as. 2. in advocacy, etc., from Late Latin -atia, forming nouns of state from nouns in -atus. 3. in fallacy, etc., from Latin -acia, forming nouns of quality from adjectives in -ax (genitive -acis). Also forming part of -cracy. Extended in English to nouns not found in Latin (accuracy) and to non-Latin words (piracy).
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ferro- 
before vowels ferr-, word-forming element indicating the presence of or derivation from iron, from Latin ferro-, combining form of ferrum "iron," which is of unknown origin. Possibly of Semitic origin, via Etruscan [Klein]; Watkins suggests "possibly borrowed (via Etruscan) from the same obscure source as OE bræs "brass." Also sometimes especially indicative of the presence of iron in the ferrous state; ferri- indicating iron in the ferric state.
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-sis 
suffix in Greek-derived nouns denoting action, process, state, condition, from Greek -sis, which is identical in meaning with Latin -entia, English -ing (1).
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-ency 

word-forming element denoting quality or state, from Latin -entia. Derivatively identical with -ence; also see -ancy. The slight difference of sense is that -ence can and -ency cannot mean "an act of ____."

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-head 
word-forming element meaning "state or condition of being," Middle English -hede, from a variant of Old English -had, the source of -hood. The only surviving words with it are maidenhead and godhead.
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