Etymology
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ire (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French ire "anger, wrath, violence" (11c.), from Latin ira "anger, wrath, rage, passion," from PIE root *eis- (1), forming various words denoting passion (source also of Greek hieros "filled with the divine, holy," oistros "gadfly," originally "thing causing madness;" Sanskrit esati "drives on," yasati "boils;" Avestan aesma "anger;" Lithuanian aistra "violent passion").

Old English irre in a similar sense is unrelated; it is from an adjective irre "wandering, straying, angry," which is cognate with Old Saxon irri "angry," Old High German irri "wandering, deranged," also "angry;" Gothic airzeis "astray," and Latin errare "wander, go astray, angry" (see err (v.)).

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ireful (adj.)
c. 1300, from ire (n.) + -ful. Related: Irefully.
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Dies Irae 
literally "day of wrath," first words of Latin hymn of Last Judgment, attributed to Thomas of Celano (c. 1250). See diurnal + ire.
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hierophobia (n.)
"fear of sacred things or persons," 1816, from hiero- "holy," from Greek hieros (see ire) + -phobia. Related: Hierophobic.
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hierocracy (n.)
"rule or government by priests," 1794, from hiero-, from Greek hieros "sacred, holy, divine" (see ire) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Hierocratic.
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irate (adj.)
1838, from Latin iratus "angry, enraged, violent, furious," past participle of irasci "grow angry," from ira "anger" (see ire).
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Ares 
Greek god of war in all its violence, brutality, confusion, and destruction; identified by Romans with their Mars; literally "injurer, destroyer," from are "bane, ruin," and perhaps cognate with Sanskrit irasya "ill-will" (see ire).
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Jerome 

masc. proper name, from French Jérome, from Late Latin Hieronymus, from Greek Hieronymos, literally "holy name," from hieros "holy" (see ire) + onyma, dialectal form of onoma "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

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hieratic (adj.)
"pertaining to sacred things," 1660s, from Latin hieraticus, from Greek hieratikos "pertaining to a priest or his office, priestly, devoted to sacred purposes," from hierateia "priesthood," from hiereus "priest," from hieros "sacred, holy, hallowed; superhuman, mighty; divine" (see ire). Related: Hieratical (1650s).
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hierophant (n.)

"expounder of sacred mysteries," 1670s, from Late Latin hierophantes, from Greek hierophantes "one who teaches the rites of sacrifice and worship," literally "one who shows sacred things," from hieros "sacred," from PIE root *eis-, forming words denoting passion (see ire) + phainein "to reveal, bring to light" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine"). In modern use, "expounder of esoteric doctrines," from 1822.

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