Etymology
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ipse dixit 
Latin, literally "he (the master) said it," translation of Greek autos epha, phrase used by disciples of Pythagoras when quoting their master. Hence, "an assertion made without proof, resting entirely on the authority of the speaker" (1590s), ipsedixitism "practice of dogmatic assertion" (1830, Bentham), etc.
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ipseity (n.)
"personal identity, individuality, selfhood," 1650s, from Latin ipse "self" + -ity.
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ipsilateral (adj.)
"on the same side of the body," 1907, from Latin ipse "self" + lateral (adj.). Related: Ipsilaterally.
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ipso facto 
Latin adverbial phrase, literally "by that very fact, by the fact itself," from neuter ablative of ipse "he, himself, self" + ablative of factum "fact" (see fact).
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solipsism (n.)
1871, coined from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)) + ipse "self." The view or theory that self is the only object of real knowledge or the only thing that is real. "The identification of one's self with the Absolute is not generally intended, but the denial of there being really anybody else" [Century Dictionary].
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