Etymology
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iodine (n.)

non-metallic element, 1814, formed by English chemist Sir Humphry Davy from French iode "iodine," which was coined 1812 by French chemist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac from Greek ioeides "violet-colored" (from ion "the violet; dark blue flower;" see violet) + eidos "appearance" (see -oid).

Davy added the chemical suffix -ine (2) to make it analogous with chlorine and fluorine. So called from the color of the vapor given off when the crystals are heated.

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iodide (n.)
compound of iodine, 1822, from iod-, combining form of iodine used before vowels + -ide.
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iodic (adj.)
1815, from French iodic (1812); see iodine + -ic.
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iodize (v.)
"add iodine to, treat with iodine," 1841, from iodine + -ize. Related: Iodized; iodizing.
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iopterous (adj.)

"having violet wings," 1855, from Greek ion "violet, violet color" (see iodine) + pteron "wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly").

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violet (n.)

small wild plant with purplish-blue flowers, c. 1300, from Old French violete (12c.), diminutive of viole "violet," from Latin viola "the violet, a violet color," cognate with Greek ion (see iodine), probably from a pre-Indo-European substrate Mediterranean language. The color sense (late 14c.) developed from the flower.

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daguerreotype (n.)

"picture taken with an early photographic process involving silver plates, iodine, and vapor of mercury," 1839, from French daguerreotype, coined from the name of the inventor, Louis J.M. Daguerre (1789-1851) + -type (see type (n.)). As a verb from 1839. Related: Daguerreotypist.

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