Etymology
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involve (v.)

late 14c., "envelop, surround; make cloudy or obscure," from Old French involver and directly from Latin involvere "envelop, surround, overwhelm," literally "roll into," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." Mid-15c. as "concern oneself." Sense of "take in, include" first recorded c. 1600. Related: Involved; Involving.

Obscurest night involved the sky,
The Atlantic billows roared,
[Cowper, "The Castaway"]
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involved (adj.)
"complicated," 1640s, past-participle adjective from involve. Earlier it meant "spirally curved" (1610s).
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involute (adj.)
early 15c., "wrapped," from Latin involutus "rolled up, intricate, obscure," past participle of involvere "envelop, surround; roll into, wrap up" (see involve).
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involution (n.)
late 14c., "condition of being twisted or coiled; a fold or entanglement," originally in anatomy, from Late Latin involutionem (nominative involutio) "a rolling up," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin involvere "envelop, surround, roll into" (see involve). Related: Involutional.
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*wel- (3)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to turn, revolve," with derivatives referring to curved, enclosing objects.

It forms all or part of: archivolt; circumvolve; convoluted; convolution; devolve; elytra; evolution; evolve; Helicon; helicopter; helix; helminth; lorimer; ileus; involve; revolt; revolution; revolve; valve; vault (v.1) "jump or leap over;" vault (n.1) "arched roof or ceiling;" volte-face; voluble; volume; voluminous; volute; volvox; volvulus; vulva; wale; walk; wallet; wallow; waltz; well (v.) "to spring, rise, gush;" welter; whelk; willow.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit valate "turns round," ulvam "womb, vulva;" Lithuanian valtis "twine, net," vilnis "wave," apvalus "round;" Old Church Slavonic valiti "roll, welter," vlŭna "wave;" Greek eluein "to roll round, wind, enwrap," eilein "twist, turn, squeeze; revolve, rotate," helix "spiral object;" Latin volvere "to turn, twist;" Gothic walwjan "to roll;" Old English wealwian "roll," weoloc "whelk, spiral-shelled mollusk;" Old High German walzan "to roll, waltz;" Old Irish fulumain "rolling;" Welsh olwyn "wheel."
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benight (v.)
1550s, "to be overtaken by darkness;" 1630s, "to involve with darkness," from be- + night. Figurative sense of "to involve in moral or intellectual darkness" is from c. 1600, and the word is rarely used now except in the figurative past-participle adjective benighted.
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implicate (v.)
early 15c., "to convey (truth) in a fable," from Latin implicatus, past participle of implicare "to involve, entwine, entangle, embrace," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). From c. 1600 as "intertwine, wreathe." Meaning "involve (someone) in a crime, charge, etc.; show (someone) to be involved" is from 1797. Related: Implicated; implicating.
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intermeddle (v.)
late 14c., entremedlen, "to mix together, blend," from Anglo-French entremedler, Old French entremesler; from inter- + Anglo-French medler (see meddle (v.)). From early 15c. as "involve oneself in what is not one's business."
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mire (v.)

c. 1400, in figurative sense of "to involve in difficulties," from mire (n.). Literal sense of "to plunge or fix in mire, sink or stall in mud" is from 1550s; that of "to cover in mud or filth" is from c. 1500. Related: Mired; miring.

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