Etymology
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invitation (n.)
mid-15c., "act of inviting, solicitation," from Latin invitationem (nominative invitatio) "an invitation, incitement, challenge," noun of action from past participle stem of invitare "invite, treat, entertain," originally "be pleasant toward," from in- "toward" (from PIE root *en "in").

The second element is obscure. Watkins suggests a suffixed form of the PIE root *weie- "to go after something, pursue with vigor" (see gain (v.)); de Vaan also traces it to a PIE form meaning "pursued." Meaning "the spoken or written form in which a person is invited" is from 1610s.
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invitational (adj.)
1894, from invitation + -al (1). The noun is by 1940, short for invitational tournament.
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invitatory (adj.)

"using or containing invitation," 1640s, from Latin invitatorius "inviting," from invitat-, past-participle stem of invitare "to invite, treat, entertain" (see invitation).

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invite (v.)

"solicit to come," 1530s, a back-formation from invitation, or else from French inviter (15c.), from Latin invitare "to invite," also "to summon, challenge; to feast, to entertain," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Invited; inviting.

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invita Minerva 
Latin adverbial phrase, used with reference to literary or artistic creation, "without inspiration," literally "Minerva unwilling;" i.e. "without inspiration from the goddess of wisdom;" ablative fem. of invitus "against the will, unwilling, reluctant," according to de Vaan from PIE compound *n-uih-to- "not turned to, not pursuing," related to the source of invitation. With Minervā, ablative absolute of Minerva.
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vie (v.)
1560s, "to bet, make a bet," (literally "make a vie, the noun attested from 1530s in cards), especially in card-playing, "to wager the value of one's hand against an opponent's," shortened form of Middle English envie "make a challenge," from Old French envier "compete (against), provoke; invite, summon, subpoena;" in gambling, "put down a stake, up the bet;" from Latin invitare "to invite," also "to summon, challenge" (see invitation). Sense of "to contend (with) in rivalry" in English is from 1560s; that of "to contend, compete, strive for superiority" is from c. 1600.
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invite (n.)
"an invitation," 1650s, from invite (v.).
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disinvite (v.)

"recall an invitation to," 1570s; see dis- + invite. Related: Disinvited; disinviting. Compare uninvite.

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uninvite (v.)
"countermand an invitation," 1660s, from un- (2) "opposite of" + invite (v.). Related: Uninvited; uninviting.
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go-ahead (adj.)
by 1840, "pushing, driving," from verbal phrase go ahead; see go (v.) + ahead (adv.). Go ahead as a command or invitation to proceed is from 1831, American English.
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