Etymology
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investigate (v.)
c. 1500, back-formation from investigation or else from Latin investigatus, past participle of investigare "to trace out, search after," figuratively "search into, investigate," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "footprint, track" (see vestige). Related: Investigated; investigating.
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investigator (n.)
1550s, a native agent-noun formation from investigate, or else from Latin investigator "he that searches into," agent noun from past participle stem of investigare "to trace out, search after" (see investigation). Related: Investigatorial.
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HUAC (n.)
1950, American English, approximate acronym for House Committee to Investigate un-American Activities (1938-1975).
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discuss (v.)

late 14c., discussen, "to examine, investigate," from Latin discuss-, past participle stem of discutere "to dash to pieces, agitate, strike or shake apart," in Late Latin and Medieval Latin also "to discuss, examine, investigate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

Meaning "examine by argument, debate," the usual modern sense, is from mid-15c. (implied in discussing). Sense evolution in Latin appears to have been from "smash apart" to "scatter, disperse," then in post-classical times (via the mental process involved) to "investigate, examine," then to "debate." Related: Discussed.

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suss (v.)
"to figure out, investigate and discover," 1966, earlier "to suspect" (1953, police jargon), a slang shortening of suspect (v.). Related: Sussed.
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psychologize (v.)

1830, "make psychological speculations, investigate psychologically;" see psychology + -ize. Transitive sense is by 1856. Related: Psychologized; psychologizing.

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scrutinize (v.)

"observe or investigate closely," 1670s, from scrutiny + -ize. Related: Scrutinized; scrutinizing. The earlier verb was scrutine (1590s), from French scrutine, from Late Latin scrutinium.

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anatomize (v.)
"to dissect, investigate by dissection," early 15c., from Medieval Latin anatomizare, from Greek anatomia (see anatomy). Related: Anatomized; anatomizing.
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spur (v.)
c. 1200, from spur (n.). Figurative use from c. 1500. Related: Spurred; spurring. Old English had spyrian, but it meant "follow the track of, track down, investigate."
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exploratory (adj.)

mid-15c., "intended for exploration or scouting," from Latin exploratorius "belonging to scouts," from explorator "scout," from explorare "investigate, examine" (see explore). Alternative explorative is from 1738; explorational is from 1889.

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